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Article

Reducing Edible Oil Import Dependency in Tanzania: A Computable General Equilibrium CGE Approach

1
Department of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt University of Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 16, 10099 Berlin, Germany
2
SusLAND: Sustainable Land Use in Developing Countries, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF e. V), Eberswalder Str. 84, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4480; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164480
Received: 26 July 2019 / Revised: 15 August 2019 / Accepted: 16 August 2019 / Published: 19 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability)
Reducing food imports and promoting domestically produced food commodities are long-standing goals for policymakers and other stakeholders in sub-Saharan African countries. For instance, Tanzania, after a long period of dependency on imported food commodities, such as sugar and edible oils, intends to meet its demand for these commodities through domestic production by transforming its agriculture sector to achieve this goal. Applying a general computable equilibrium (CGE) model, this study determines the multiplier effects of technological progress that is assumed to foster domestic edible oilseed crop production, other crops, and Tanzania’s economy in general. Findings from the model establish an increase in domestic production not only for the edible oilseed crops but also for other commodities from other sectors of the economy. In addition, there is a decrease in prices on domestically produced commodities sold in the domestic market, and an increase in disposable income is predicted for all rural and urban households, as well as government revenues. Based on model results, we recommend that the Tanzanian government invests in technological progress and interventions that increase production in sectors such as agriculture, where it has a comparative advantage. Interventions that increase smallholder farmer’s production, such as the use of improved seed and other modern technologies that reduce costs of production, are critical for reducing food imports and improving food security. View Full-Text
Keywords: production; technological progress; edible oilseeds; CGE; Tanzania production; technological progress; edible oilseeds; CGE; Tanzania
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MDPI and ACS Style

Peter Mgeni, C.; Müller, K.; Sieber, S. Reducing Edible Oil Import Dependency in Tanzania: A Computable General Equilibrium CGE Approach. Sustainability 2019, 11, 4480. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164480

AMA Style

Peter Mgeni C, Müller K, Sieber S. Reducing Edible Oil Import Dependency in Tanzania: A Computable General Equilibrium CGE Approach. Sustainability. 2019; 11(16):4480. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164480

Chicago/Turabian Style

Peter Mgeni, Charles, Klaus Müller, and Stefan Sieber. 2019. "Reducing Edible Oil Import Dependency in Tanzania: A Computable General Equilibrium CGE Approach" Sustainability 11, no. 16: 4480. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164480

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