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Open AccessArticle

Plant Biodiversity Knowledge Varies by Gender in Sustainable Amazonian Agricultural Systems Called Chacras

1
CENBIO, Universidad UTE, Quito 170147, Ecuador
2
Departamento de Didáctica de las Ciencias Experimentales y Matemáticas, Facultad de Educación, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz, Spain
3
Departmento de Biología Vegetal, Ecología y Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad de Extremadura, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
4
Herbario Alfredo Paredes, QAP, Universidad Central de Ecuador, Quito 170147, Ecuador
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(15), 4211; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11154211
Received: 24 May 2019 / Revised: 29 July 2019 / Accepted: 1 August 2019 / Published: 4 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability, Biodiversity, and Conservation)
Chacras, which are Amazonian agricultural systems, are examples of traditional agricultural management that are sustainable. They are also characteristic of the identities of different ethnographic groups in tropical America. However, information regarding the botanical characterization of chacras is scant. In tropical rural communities, there is a gender bias hypothesis that makes women potential reservoirs of traditional chacras plant knowledge. We present an experimental study in order to demonstrate if this knowledge difference really exists and to plan accordingly. We performed workshops in an isolated Kichwa community from Amazonian Ecuador. We calculated the cultural signififcance index (CSI) for 97 local flora plants. Our results revealed statistically significant differences. They were coherent with the Kichwa worldview and the structure of their society. We concluded that gender perspective must be taken into account in biodiversity conservation programs, such as, for example, those to implement the resilient agricultural practices of tropical contexts promoted by The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 2 (SGD2). View Full-Text
Keywords: biodiversity conservation; Amazonian indigenous; women; agroecological production; livelihood; economic growth; sustainable development goals; security food; traditional knowledge; ethnobotany biodiversity conservation; Amazonian indigenous; women; agroecological production; livelihood; economic growth; sustainable development goals; security food; traditional knowledge; ethnobotany
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Luzuriaga-Quichimbo, C.X.; Hernández del Barco, M.; Blanco-Salas, J.; Cerón-Martínez, C.E.; Ruiz-Téllez, T. Plant Biodiversity Knowledge Varies by Gender in Sustainable Amazonian Agricultural Systems Called Chacras. Sustainability 2019, 11, 4211.

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