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Article

Governing Climate Finance in Fiji: Barriers, Complexity and Interconnectedness

School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia
Sustainability 2019, 11(12), 3414; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123414
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 13 June 2019 / Accepted: 13 June 2019 / Published: 21 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Law, Policy and Governance for Sustainable Development)
Pacific Island Countries are most vulnerable to the disastrous impacts of climate change; they also, however, manifest some of the most ambitious international climate commitments. Fiji, for one, has sought to respond to the escalating threat by setting highly ambitious climate mitigation targets, specifically in the energy sector. Finance is key to the realization of these goals: governors must attract and meaningfully invest vast sums to support these mitigation targets. This study, through qualitative, empirical, and inductive methods, found that a complex landscape of barriers stood between governors and the translation of finance into positive climate outcomes. The study categorized barriers into four different planes of deepening entrenchment: Level One barriers are the most tractable, whereas Level Four barriers are immovable. The study found that these barriers interrelate between levels, creating complex chains of entrenchment. A superficially tractable issue may be rendered less so by being rooted in a more entrenched issue. Empirically, this paper delineates the complex landscape of challenges, or ‘context’, that Fijian climate governors must understand in order to deliver effective governance solutions. Beyond this, this research offers a framework of broader application through which climate governors may conceptualize complex barriers. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate finance; Pacific Small Island Developing States (PSIDS); Fiji; governance; policy; development; barriers; renewable energy climate finance; Pacific Small Island Developing States (PSIDS); Fiji; governance; policy; development; barriers; renewable energy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Anantharajah, K. Governing Climate Finance in Fiji: Barriers, Complexity and Interconnectedness. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3414. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123414

AMA Style

Anantharajah K. Governing Climate Finance in Fiji: Barriers, Complexity and Interconnectedness. Sustainability. 2019; 11(12):3414. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123414

Chicago/Turabian Style

Anantharajah, Kirsty. 2019. "Governing Climate Finance in Fiji: Barriers, Complexity and Interconnectedness" Sustainability 11, no. 12: 3414. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123414

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