Next Article in Journal
Performance of an On-Site Wastewater Treatment System Using Reactive Filter Media and a Sequencing Batch Constructed Wetland
Previous Article in Journal
Exploring the Role of Community Self-Organisation in the Creation and Creative Dissolution of a Community Food Initiative
Previous Article in Special Issue
Assessment of Sustainable Development of the Performance of Higher Education Credentials in the Transitive Labor Market
Open AccessArticle

Gender and Academic Rank in the UK

1
School of Geography and Planning, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3WA, UK
2
Department of Economics, École Polytechnique ParisTech, 91128 Palaiseau, France
3
Currently at Nexialog Consulting, 75011 Paris, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3171; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113171
Received: 19 November 2018 / Revised: 1 May 2019 / Accepted: 5 May 2019 / Published: 5 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economics of Education and Sustainable Development)
This paper fills in a research gap in what concerns gender and academic rank at UK universities, where women are not far from reaching the 50% share of all academic and research staff, but not even close to reaching such a share at (full) professorial level. Using an ordered logit model and the results of a survey conducted in 2013 with 2270 responses from academics from all fields of knowledge at the 24 Russell Group universities, we find three consistent results. First, being a woman has a negative and significant association with academic rank, except for the case when parenthood is timed with career considerations in mind. Second, the percentage of time spent on teaching and teaching-related activities has a negative and statistically significant association with academic rank. This association is more pronounced in the case of women, who spend a higher percentage of their working time on teaching and teaching-related activities than men, as do those in lower academic ranks. Since women tend to be in lower ranks, the percentage of time spent on teaching and teaching-related activities may be considered both a cause and a result of the gender gap. Third, we find a positive and significant association between the number of children under the age of 18 years and the academic rank of both men and women, as long as babies were timed with career considerations in mind, and a non-significant association when they were not. A possible explanation for this is unlikely to be that children have a positive impact on academic rank, but rather that they arrived after a certain rank had been secured. We conclude with some policy recommendations to help reduce the gender gap. View Full-Text
Keywords: gender discrimination; academic progression; women faculty; female professors; maternity penalty; gender gap gender discrimination; academic progression; women faculty; female professors; maternity penalty; gender gap
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Santos, G.; Dang Van Phu, S. Gender and Academic Rank in the UK. Sustainability 2019, 11, 3171.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop