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Open AccessArticle

Decarbonization Pathways for International Maritime Transport: A Model-Based Policy Impact Assessment

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Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2243; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072243
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 21 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Freight Transport)
International shipping has finally set a target to reduce its CO2 emission by at least 50% by 2050. Despite this positive progress, this target is still not sufficient to reach Paris Agreement goals since CO2 emissions from international shipping could reach 17% of global emissions by 2050 if no measures are taken. A key factor that hampers the achievement of Paris goals is the knowledge gap in terms of what level of decarbonization it is possible to achieve using all the available technologies. This paper examines the technical possibility of achieving the 1.5° goal of the Paris Agreement and the required supporting policy measures. We project the transport demand for 6 ship types (dry bulk, container, oil tanker, gas, wet product and chemical, and general cargo) based on the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD’s) global trade projection of 25 commodities. Subsequently, we test the impact of mitigation measures on CO2 emissions until 2035 using an international freight transport and emission model. We present four possible decarbonization pathways which combine all the technologies available today. We found that an 82–95% reduction in CO2 emissions could be possible by 2035. Finally, we examine the barriers and the relevant policy measures to advance the decarbonization of international maritime transport. View Full-Text
Keywords: international shipping; maritime transport; decarbonization; Paris Agreement; freight transport model; policy measures; GHG emission; 1.5 degrees objective; carbon pricing; market-based measure international shipping; maritime transport; decarbonization; Paris Agreement; freight transport model; policy measures; GHG emission; 1.5 degrees objective; carbon pricing; market-based measure
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MDPI and ACS Style

Halim, R.A.; Kirstein, L.; Merk, O.; Martinez, L.M. Decarbonization Pathways for International Maritime Transport: A Model-Based Policy Impact Assessment. Sustainability 2018, 10, 2243. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072243

AMA Style

Halim RA, Kirstein L, Merk O, Martinez LM. Decarbonization Pathways for International Maritime Transport: A Model-Based Policy Impact Assessment. Sustainability. 2018; 10(7):2243. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072243

Chicago/Turabian Style

Halim, Ronald A.; Kirstein, Lucie; Merk, Olaf; Martinez, Luis M. 2018. "Decarbonization Pathways for International Maritime Transport: A Model-Based Policy Impact Assessment" Sustainability 10, no. 7: 2243. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072243

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