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Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020276

Adapting Bioretention Construction Details to Local Practices in Finland

Bioeconomy Research Unit, Häme University of Applied Sciences (HAMK), Lepaantie 129, FI-14610 Lepaa, Finland
Received: 18 October 2017 / Revised: 18 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 23 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Urban and Rural Development)
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Abstract

Bioretention is a method of storm water management that includes several processes following the natural hydrological cycle. Bioretention, or variations of it, include rain gardens and bioswales, infiltrates, filtrates, evapotranspirates, and help to store and manage storm water run-off. A bioretention cell retains water, removes pollutants, and provides water elements for urban green areas. Although bioretention is a promising method for multifunctional storm water management, its construction details should not be copied from other climatic areas. A direct application may dismiss local conditions, materials, and construction practices. This study aimed to adapt construction details for bioretention to Finnish local practices and conditions and to formulate bioretention constructions that balance water, soil, and vegetation. First, construction details were reviewed, then local adaptations were applied, and finally, the application and two variations of growing media in two construction depths were tested in a test field in Southern Finland. Sandy growing media allowed the efficient retention of water during the first year, but failed to provide vital growth. The use of topsoil and compost in the growing media improved growth, but held high electrical conductivity after infiltration. All the experimental cells in the test field showed activity during the melting periods, both during winter and spring. If bioretention plays a multifunctional role in urban design and engineered ecology, the design parameters should not only focus on storm water quantity, but also on quality management and vegetation growth. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioretention; storm water management; test field; growing media; heavy rain simulation; vegetation cover; cold climate bioretention; storm water management; test field; growing media; heavy rain simulation; vegetation cover; cold climate
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Tahvonen, O. Adapting Bioretention Construction Details to Local Practices in Finland. Sustainability 2018, 10, 276.

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