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Building an Industry-Oriented Business Sustainability Curriculum in Higher Education

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Department of Cosmetics Science, Chia-Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 71710, Taiwan
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Graduate Institute of Global Business and Strategy, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 10645, Taiwan
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Department of Logistics Management, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4698; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124698
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 27 November 2018 / Accepted: 7 December 2018 / Published: 10 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Education for Sustainability)
In the past, research addressing the issues reflecting industrial needs for sustainability-related curriculum design in higher education has been limited. To narrow this gap and to provide students with better business sustainability curricula, we propose employing a mapping concept to extract the opinions and needs of industrial professionals. A total of 14 industrial professionals were invited to brainstorm on topics of business sustainability to be included in the curriculum, and we were able to obtain 52 topics. The participants were then asked to group the topics on the basis of their own perception of similarity, and rated their importance and difficulty levels. To associate the topics into clusters, we conducted multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis. We achieved five clusters: resource usage reduction and management, corporate governance and labor safety, business sustainability practices, employee rights and community involvement, and knowledge of the regulations. A derived importance–performance analysis (dIPA) was later implemented to further categorize the topics on the basis of the distinct levels of importance and difficulty of each topic. The four quadrants in dIPA could act as guidelines for designing a series of progressive courses on business sustainability in higher education. View Full-Text
Keywords: industrial needs; concept mapping; importance–performance analysis; business sustainability curriculum; higher education industrial needs; concept mapping; importance–performance analysis; business sustainability curriculum; higher education
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Chen, M.-H.; Wu, Y.J.; Tsai, K.-M. Building an Industry-Oriented Business Sustainability Curriculum in Higher Education. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4698.

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