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Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4552; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124552

Investigating the Effects of the Built Environment on PM2.5 and PM10: A Case Study of Seoul Metropolitan City, South Korea

Department of Urban Planning, Keimyung University, Daegu 42601, Korea
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Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 26 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 2 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Sustainable Built Environment)
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Abstract

Air pollution has a major impact on human health and quality of life; therefore, its determinants should be studied to promote effective management and reduction. Here, we examined the influence of the built environment on air pollution by analyzing the relationship between the built environment and particulate matter (i.e., PM2.5 and PM10). Air pollution data collected in Seoul in 2014 were spatially mapped using geographic information system tools, and PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations were determined in individual neighborhoods using an interpolation method. PM2.5 and PM10 failed to show spatial autocorrelation; therefore, we analyzed the associations between PM fractions and built environment characteristics using an ordinary least squares regression model. PM2.5 and PM10 exhibited some differences in spatial distributions, suggesting that the built environment has different effects on these fractions. For instance, high PM10 concentrations were associated with neighborhoods with more bus routes, bus stops, and river areas. Meanwhile, both PM2.5 and PM10 were more likely to be high in areas with more commercial areas and multi-family housing, but low in areas with more main roads, more single-family housing, and high average gross commercial floor area. This study is expected to contribute to establishing policies and strategies to promote sustainability in Seoul, Korea. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; built environment; geographic information system; particulate matter air pollution; built environment; geographic information system; particulate matter
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Park, S.-H.; Ko, D.-W. Investigating the Effects of the Built Environment on PM2.5 and PM10: A Case Study of Seoul Metropolitan City, South Korea. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4552.

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