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Open AccessArticle

A Conceptual Framework for Heuristic Progress in Exploring Management Regime Shifts in Biodiversity Conservation and Climate Change Adaptation of Coastal Areas

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Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, CNRS-Université de Montpellier-Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier-EPHE, 1919 route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier CEDEX 5, France
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Institut Français de Pondichéry, UMIFRE 21 CNRS/MAEE, 11 Saint Louis Street, Puducherry 605001, India
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RESSOURCE, 3095 route de Boulbon, 13570 Barbentane, France
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Laboratoire Méditerranéen de Sociologie, CNRS-Université Aix-Marseille, UMR 7305, France
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Institut d’Ecologie et Sciences de l’Environnement de Paris—iEES Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France
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Sustainability Research Unit, Nelson Mandela University, P.O.Box 6531, George 6530, South Africa
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World Wildlife Fund (WWF), c/o Nelson Mandela University, George 6530, South Africa
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School of sustainability, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 875502, Tempe, AZ 85287-5502, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 4171; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10114171
Received: 28 August 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Nature Interactions)
Social conflicts related to biodiversity conservation and adaptation policy to climate change in coastal areas illustrate the need to reinforce understanding of the “matters of concern” as well as the “matters of fact”. In this paper, we argue that we must rethink adaptation from a new perspective, considering that humans together function as both ecological actors and social actors. Using international examples from the UNESCO world biosphere reserve network, we show that an ontological perspective may provide a simple and compact way to think about coupled infrastructure systems and systematic formalism, allowing for understanding of the relational matrix between actors, institutions and ecosystems. We contend that our formalism responds to three challenges. First, it encompasses the different regional contexts and policies that rely on the same ontology. Second, it provides a method to relate any local adaptation plan to the conservation paradigms that originate from the ecological modernization of policies. Third, it facilitates the discovery of drivers and processes involved in adaptation and management regime shifts by highlighting the way contextual factors configure, determine the structure of the action situation of the Institutional Analysis and Development framework (IAD) (Ostrom 2005), and how it operates. View Full-Text
Keywords: ontology; IAD framework; adaptation; management regime; social–ecological system; biosphere reserves; Camargue; Danube; Garden Route ontology; IAD framework; adaptation; management regime; social–ecological system; biosphere reserves; Camargue; Danube; Garden Route
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Mathevet, R.; Allouche, A.; Nicolas, L.; Mitroi, V.; Fabricius, C.; Guerbois, C.; Anderies, J.M. A Conceptual Framework for Heuristic Progress in Exploring Management Regime Shifts in Biodiversity Conservation and Climate Change Adaptation of Coastal Areas. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4171.

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