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Article

Exposing Sustainable Mortars with Nanosilica, Zinc Stearate, and Ethyl Silicate Coating to Sulfuric Acid Attack

1
Departamento de Arquitectura y Tecnología de la Edificación, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, 30203 Murcia, Spain
2
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Alicante, 03690 Alicante, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3769; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103769
Received: 17 September 2018 / Revised: 15 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Cementitious Materials for the Construction Industry)
Obtaining durable materials that lengthen the service life of constructions and thereby contribute to sustainability requires research into products that improve the durability of cementitious materials under aggressive conditions. This paper studies the effects of sulfuric acid exposure on four mortar types (control mortar, mortar with nanosilica, mortar with zinc stearate, and mortar with an ethyl silicate coating), and evaluates which of them have better performance against the acid attack. After 28 days of curing, the samples were exposed to a sulfuric acid attack by immersing them in a 3% w/w of H2SO4 solution. Physical changes (mass loss, ultrasonic pulse velocity, open porosity, and water absorption), and mechanical changes (compressive strength) were determined after the sulfuric acid exposure. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to characterize the morphology of the surface mortars after the exposure. The control mortar had the highest compressive strength after the acid attack, although of the four types, the zinc stearate mortar showed the lowest percentage of strength loss. The zinc stearate mortar had the lowest mass loss after the acid exposure; moreover, it had the lowest capillary water absorption coefficient (demonstrating its hydrophobic effect) both in a non-aggressive environment and acid attack. View Full-Text
Keywords: zinc stearate; nanosilica; ethyl silicate; sulfate exposure; sulfuric acid attack; durability zinc stearate; nanosilica; ethyl silicate; sulfate exposure; sulfuric acid attack; durability
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MDPI and ACS Style

García-Vera, V.E.; Tenza-Abril, A.J.; Lanzón, M.; Saval, J.M. Exposing Sustainable Mortars with Nanosilica, Zinc Stearate, and Ethyl Silicate Coating to Sulfuric Acid Attack. Sustainability 2018, 10, 3769. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103769

AMA Style

García-Vera VE, Tenza-Abril AJ, Lanzón M, Saval JM. Exposing Sustainable Mortars with Nanosilica, Zinc Stearate, and Ethyl Silicate Coating to Sulfuric Acid Attack. Sustainability. 2018; 10(10):3769. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103769

Chicago/Turabian Style

García-Vera, Victoria E., Antonio J. Tenza-Abril, Marcos Lanzón, and José M. Saval. 2018. "Exposing Sustainable Mortars with Nanosilica, Zinc Stearate, and Ethyl Silicate Coating to Sulfuric Acid Attack" Sustainability 10, no. 10: 3769. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103769

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