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The Neural Basis of Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus (SVIN)
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Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test (SVINT) in Vestibular Migraine and Menière’s Disease

ENT Division, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132 Milano, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Georges Dumas, Sébastien Schmerber and Philippe P. Perrin
Audiol. Res. 2021, 11(4), 603-608; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres11040054
Received: 8 September 2021 / Revised: 3 November 2021 / Accepted: 4 November 2021 / Published: 8 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test)
Background: Vestibular migraine (VM) and Menière’s disease (MD) are the two most frequent episodic vertigo apart from Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) differential diagnosis for them may be troublesome in the early stages. SVINT is a newly proposed vestibular test, which demonstrated to be fast and reliable in diagnoses above all of peripheral vestibular deficits. Methods: We retrieved clinical data from two groups of subjects (200 VM and 605 MD), enrolled between 2010 and 2020. Among others, these subjects were included when performing a SVINT. The purpose of the study is to assess if SVINT can be useful to differentiate the two episodic disorders. Results: 59.2% of MD subjects presented as positive with SVINT while only 6% did so with VM; among other tests, only video HIT demonstrated a different frequency in the two groups (13.1% and 0.5%, respectively), but the low sensitivity in these subjects makes the test unaffordable for diagnostic purposes. Conclusions: Since SVINT demonstrated to be positive in a peripheral vestibular deficit in previous works, we think that our data are consistent with the hypothesis that, in the pathophysiology of VM attacks, the central vestibular pathways are mainly involved. View Full-Text
Keywords: vestibular migraine; Menière’s disease; skull vibration-induced nystagmus test; SVINT; vestibular disorders; episodic vertigo vestibular migraine; Menière’s disease; skull vibration-induced nystagmus test; SVINT; vestibular disorders; episodic vertigo
MDPI and ACS Style

Teggi, R.; Gatti, O.; Familiari, M.; Cangiano, I.; Bussi, M. Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test (SVINT) in Vestibular Migraine and Menière’s Disease. Audiol. Res. 2021, 11, 603-608. https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres11040054

AMA Style

Teggi R, Gatti O, Familiari M, Cangiano I, Bussi M. Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test (SVINT) in Vestibular Migraine and Menière’s Disease. Audiology Research. 2021; 11(4):603-608. https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres11040054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Teggi, Roberto, Omar Gatti, Marco Familiari, Iacopo Cangiano, and Mario Bussi. 2021. "Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test (SVINT) in Vestibular Migraine and Menière’s Disease" Audiology Research 11, no. 4: 603-608. https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres11040054

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