Next Article in Journal
Modeling of Body Weight Metrics for Effective and Cost-Efficient Conventional Factor VIII Dosing in Hemophilia A Prophylaxis
Next Article in Special Issue
GE11 Peptide as an Active Targeting Agent in Antitumor Therapy: A Minireview
Previous Article in Journal
Disposition, Metabolism and Histone Deacetylase and Acetyltransferase Inhibition Activity of Tetrahydrocurcumin and Other Curcuminoids
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nanotechnologies in Pancreatic Cancer Therapy
Article Menu
Issue 4 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Pharmaceutics 2017, 9(4), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics9040046

Targeting Strategies for the Combination Treatment of Cancer Using Drug Delivery Systems

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Massachusetts, 1 University Ave, Lowell, MA 01854, USA
2
Confocal Imaging Core, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue Boston, MA 02215, USA
3
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, 1 University Ave, Lowell, MA 01854, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 1 October 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 14 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology Advances in Cancer Treatment)
Full-Text   |   PDF [4621 KB, uploaded 14 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

Cancer cells have characteristics of acquired and intrinsic resistances to chemotherapy treatment—due to the hostile tumor microenvironment—that create a significant challenge for effective therapeutic regimens. Multidrug resistance, collateral toxicity to normal cells, and detrimental systemic side effects present significant obstacles, necessitating alternative and safer treatment strategies. Traditional administration of chemotherapeutics has demonstrated minimal success due to the non-specificity of action, uptake and rapid clearance by the immune system, and subsequent metabolic alteration and poor tumor penetration. Nanomedicine can provide a more effective approach to targeting cancer by focusing on the vascular, tissue, and cellular characteristics that are unique to solid tumors. Targeted methods of treatment using nanoparticles can decrease the likelihood of resistant clonal populations of cancerous cells. Dual encapsulation of chemotherapeutic drug allows simultaneous targeting of more than one characteristic of the tumor. Several first-generation, non-targeted nanomedicines have received clinical approval starting with Doxil® in 1995. However, more than two decades later, second-generation or targeted nanomedicines have yet to be approved for treatment despite promising results in pre-clinical studies. This review highlights recent studies using targeted nanoparticles for cancer treatment focusing on approaches that target either the tumor vasculature (referred to as ‘vascular targeting’), the tumor microenvironment (‘tissue targeting’) or the individual cancer cells (‘cellular targeting’). Recent studies combining these different targeting methods are also discussed in this review. Finally, this review summarizes some of the reasons for the lack of clinical success in the field of targeted nanomedicines. View Full-Text
Keywords: tumor targeting; nanomedicine; drug delivery; multidrug resistance; cellular; vascular; tissue; combination treatment; enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect tumor targeting; nanomedicine; drug delivery; multidrug resistance; cellular; vascular; tissue; combination treatment; enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kydd, J.; Jadia, R.; Velpurisiva, P.; Gad, A.; Paliwal, S.; Rai, P. Targeting Strategies for the Combination Treatment of Cancer Using Drug Delivery Systems. Pharmaceutics 2017, 9, 46.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Pharmaceutics EISSN 1999-4923 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top