Next Article in Journal
Hybrid Pectin-Liposome Formulation against Multi-Resistant Bacterial Strains
Next Article in Special Issue
Efficient Transfection of Large Plasmids Encoding HIV-1 into Human Cells—A High Potential Transfection System Based on a Peptide Mimicking Cationic Lipid
Previous Article in Journal
Adeno-Associated Virus Mediated Gene Therapy for Corneal Diseases
Previous Article in Special Issue
Development of Mannose-Modified Carboxylated Curdlan-Coated Liposomes for Antigen Presenting Cell Targeted Antigen Delivery
Article

Cyclopropenium Nanoparticles and Gene Transfection in Cells

1
Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy-Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91120, Israel
2
Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
3
School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Yaguan Road 135, Tianjin 300350, China
4
The Alex Grass Center for Drug Design and Synthesis and Center for Cannabis Research and the Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy-Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91120, Israel
5
Innovation Center for Advanced Technology, Matrix, Inc., New York, NY 10029, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(8), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12080768
Received: 23 July 2020 / Revised: 10 August 2020 / Accepted: 11 August 2020 / Published: 13 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liposomes for Gene and Drug Delivery)
Non-viral vectors for the transfection of genetic material are at the frontier of medical science. In this article, we introduce for the first time, cyclopropenium-containing nanoparticles as a cationic carrier for gene transfection, as an alternative to the common quaternary ammonium transfection agents. Cyclopropenium-based cationic nanoparticles were prepared by crosslinking poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) with tetrachlorocyclopropene. These nanoparticles were electrostatically complexed with plasmid DNA into nanoparticles (~50 nm). Their cellular uptake into F929 mouse fibroblast cells, and their eventual expression in vitro have been described. Transfection is enhanced relative to PEI with minimal toxicity. These cyclopropenium nanoparticles possess efficient gene transfection capabilities with minimal cytotoxicity, which makes them novel and promising candidates for gene therapy. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyclopropenium; cationic nanoparticles; gene transfection; poly(ethylene imine) cyclopropenium; cationic nanoparticles; gene transfection; poly(ethylene imine)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Steinman, N.Y.; Campos, L.M.; Feng, Y.; Domb, A.J.; Hosseinkhani, H. Cyclopropenium Nanoparticles and Gene Transfection in Cells. Pharmaceutics 2020, 12, 768. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12080768

AMA Style

Steinman NY, Campos LM, Feng Y, Domb AJ, Hosseinkhani H. Cyclopropenium Nanoparticles and Gene Transfection in Cells. Pharmaceutics. 2020; 12(8):768. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12080768

Chicago/Turabian Style

Steinman, Noam Y., Luis M. Campos, Yakai Feng, Abraham J. Domb, and Hossein Hosseinkhani. 2020. "Cyclopropenium Nanoparticles and Gene Transfection in Cells" Pharmaceutics 12, no. 8: 768. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12080768

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop