Next Article in Journal
Phenotypical Characterization of the Nuclear Egress of Recombinant Cytomegaloviruses Reveals Defective Replication upon ORF-UL50 Deletion but Not pUL50 Phosphosite Mutation
Previous Article in Journal
Interactions of Influenza and SARS-CoV-2 with the Lung Endothelium: Similarities, Differences, and Implications for Therapy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Assessment of Viral Targeted Sequence Capture Using Nanopore Sequencing Directly from Clinical Samples
Open AccessArticle

First Detection of Bat Astroviruses (BtAstVs) among Bats in Poland: The Genetic BtAstVs Diversity Reveals Multiple Co-Infection of Bats with Different Strains

1
Department of Virology, National Veterinary Research Institute, Al. Partyzantów 57, 24-100 Puławy, Poland
2
Department of Omics Analyses, National Veterinary Research Institute, Al. Partyzantów 57, 24-100 Puławy, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Arvind Varsani, Simona Kraberger and Gareth Trubl
Viruses 2021, 13(2), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020158
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 19 January 2021 / Accepted: 19 January 2021 / Published: 22 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viral Genomics: Elucidating Virology in a Metagenomic World)
Background: Astroviruses (AstVs) are common pathogens of a wide range of animal hosts, including mammals and avians, causing gastrointestinal diseases, mainly gastroenteritis and diarrhea. They prompt a significant health problem in newborns and young children and economic losses in the poultry sector and mink farms. Recent studies revealed a growing number of bat species carrying astroviruses with a noticeable prevalence and diversity. Here, we demonstrate the first detection of bat astroviruses (BtAstVs) circulating in the population of insectivorous bats in the territory of Poland. Results: Genetically diverse BtAstVs (n = 18) were found with a varying degree of bat species specificity in five out of 15 bat species in Poland previously recognized as BtAstV hosts. Astroviral RNA was found in 12 out of 98 (12.2%, 95% CI 7.1–20.2) bat intestines, six bat kidneys (6.1%, 95% CI 2.8–12.7) and two bat livers (2.0%, 95% CI 0.4–7.1). Deep sequencing of the astroviral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) region revealed co-infections in five single bat individuals with highly distinct astrovirus strains. Conclusions: The detection of highly distinct bat astroviruses in Polish bats favors virus recombination and the generation of novel divergent AstVs and creates a potential risk of virus transmission to domestic animals and humans in the country. These findings provide a new insight into molecular epidemiology, prevalence of astroviruses in European bat populations and the risk of interspecies transmission to other animals including humans. View Full-Text
Keywords: astroviruses; bats; prevalence; Poland; phylogenetics astroviruses; bats; prevalence; Poland; phylogenetics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Orłowska, A.; Smreczak, M.; Potyrało, P.; Bomba, A.; Trębas, P.; Rola, J. First Detection of Bat Astroviruses (BtAstVs) among Bats in Poland: The Genetic BtAstVs Diversity Reveals Multiple Co-Infection of Bats with Different Strains. Viruses 2021, 13, 158. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020158

AMA Style

Orłowska A, Smreczak M, Potyrało P, Bomba A, Trębas P, Rola J. First Detection of Bat Astroviruses (BtAstVs) among Bats in Poland: The Genetic BtAstVs Diversity Reveals Multiple Co-Infection of Bats with Different Strains. Viruses. 2021; 13(2):158. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020158

Chicago/Turabian Style

Orłowska, Anna; Smreczak, Marcin; Potyrało, Patrycja; Bomba, Arkadiusz; Trębas, Paweł; Rola, Jerzy. 2021. "First Detection of Bat Astroviruses (BtAstVs) among Bats in Poland: The Genetic BtAstVs Diversity Reveals Multiple Co-Infection of Bats with Different Strains" Viruses 13, no. 2: 158. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020158

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop