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A Perspective on Organoids for Virology Research
Open AccessCommunication

The Potentials and Pitfalls of a Human Cervical Organoid Model Including Langerhans Cells

1
Biotechnology Program, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada
2
Probe Development and Biomarker Exploration, Thunder Bay Regional Health Research Institute, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 6V4, Canada
3
Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada
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Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Margaret Scull
Viruses 2020, 12(12), 1375; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12121375
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 20 November 2020 / Accepted: 27 November 2020 / Published: 1 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Application of 3D Tissue Culture Systems in Virology)
Three-dimensional cell culturing to capture a life-like experimental environment has become a versatile tool for basic and clinical research. Mucosal and skin tissues can be grown as “organoids” in a petri dish and serve a wide variety of research questions. Here, we report our experience with human cervical organoids which could also include an immune component, e.g., Langerhans cells. We employ commercially available human cervical keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well as a myeloid cell line matured and purified into langerin-positive Langerhans cells. These are then seeded on a layer of keratinocytes with underlying dermal equivalent. Using about 10-fold more than the reported number in healthy cervical tissue (1–3%), we obtain differentiated cervical epithelium after 14 days with ~1% being Langerhans cells. We provide a detailed protocol for interested researchers to apply the described “aseptic” organoid model for all sorts of investigations—with or without Langerhans cells. View Full-Text
Keywords: cervical; keratinocytes; organoids; MUTZ cell line; Langerhans cells cervical; keratinocytes; organoids; MUTZ cell line; Langerhans cells
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jackson, R.; Lukacs, J.D.; Zehbe, I. The Potentials and Pitfalls of a Human Cervical Organoid Model Including Langerhans Cells. Viruses 2020, 12, 1375. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12121375

AMA Style

Jackson R, Lukacs JD, Zehbe I. The Potentials and Pitfalls of a Human Cervical Organoid Model Including Langerhans Cells. Viruses. 2020; 12(12):1375. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12121375

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jackson, Robert; Lukacs, Jordan D.; Zehbe, Ingeborg. 2020. "The Potentials and Pitfalls of a Human Cervical Organoid Model Including Langerhans Cells" Viruses 12, no. 12: 1375. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12121375

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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