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Viruses 2019, 11(1), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/v11010085

The Incorporation of Host Proteins into the External HIV-1 Envelope

1
Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Harbord Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3G5, Canada
2
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 16 January 2019 / Published: 20 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CSV2018: The 2nd symposium of the Canadian Society for Virology (CSV))
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Abstract

The incorporation of biologically active host proteins into HIV-1 is a well-established phenomenon, particularly due to the budding mechanism of viral egress in which viruses acquire their external lipid membrane directly from the host cell. While this mechanism might seemingly imply that host protein incorporation is a passive uptake of all cellular antigens associated with the plasma membrane at the site of budding, this is not the case. Herein, we review the evidence indicating that host protein incorporation can be a selective and conserved process. We discuss how HIV-1 virions displaying host proteins on their surface can exhibit a myriad of altered phenotypes, with notable impacts on infectivity, homing, neutralization, and pathogenesis. This review describes the canonical and emerging methods to detect host protein incorporation, highlights the well-established host proteins that have been identified on HIV-1 virions, and reflects on the role of these incorporated proteins in viral pathogenesis and therapeutic targeting. Despite many advances in HIV treatment and prevention, there remains a global effort to develop increasingly effective anti-HIV therapies. Given the broad range of biologically active host proteins acquired on the surface of HIV-1, additional studies on the mechanisms and impacts of these incorporated host proteins may inform the development of novel treatments and vaccine designs. View Full-Text
Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus; host protein incorporation; integrin α4β7; major histocompatibility complex (MHC); CD54 (ICAM-1); CD4+ T cells; monocytes/macrophages; virion immunocapture; nanoscale flow cytometry; viral pathogenesis human immunodeficiency virus; host protein incorporation; integrin α4β7; major histocompatibility complex (MHC); CD54 (ICAM-1); CD4+ T cells; monocytes/macrophages; virion immunocapture; nanoscale flow cytometry; viral pathogenesis
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Burnie, J.; Guzzo, C. The Incorporation of Host Proteins into the External HIV-1 Envelope. Viruses 2019, 11, 85.

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