Next Article in Journal
Effects of Seedling Quality and Family on Performance of Northern Red Oak Seedlings on a Xeric Upland Site
Next Article in Special Issue
Strip Clear-Cutting Application and Logging Typologies for Renaturalization of Pine Afforestation—A Case Study
Previous Article in Journal
The Performance of Five Willow Cultivars under Different Pedoclimatic Conditions and Rotation Cycles
Previous Article in Special Issue
Designing Thinning Operations in 2nd Age Class Pine Stands—Economic and Environmental Implications
Article Menu
Issue 6 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2018, 9(6), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9060350

Palaeoecological Evidence for Survival of Scots Pine through the Late Holocene in Western Ireland: Implications for Ecological Management

1
Dublin Bay Biosphere Partnership, Dublin City Council, Parks & Landscape Services Division, Civic Offices, Wood Quay, Dublin 8, Ireland
2
Department of Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 April 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecological Management of Pine Forests)
Full-Text   |   PDF [9423 KB, uploaded 20 June 2018]   |  

Abstract

The dynamics of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Europe during the Holocene have been spatially and temporally complex. The species underwent extirpation and reintroduction in several north-west European countries. This study investigated the late Holocene vegetation history of a present-day pinewood in western Ireland, to test the widely accepted hypothesis that P. sylvestris became extinct in Ireland c. AD 400. Palaeoecological, chronological and loss-on-ignition analyses were conducted on a sediment core extracted from an adjacent lake. The pollen profile showed no major Pinus decline and a Pinus macrofossil occurred c. AD 840, indicating localised survival of P. sylvestris from c. AD 350 to the present. The available archival maps and historical literature provide supporting evidence for continuity of forest cover. The hypothesis that P. sylvestris became extinct in Ireland is rejected. The implications for ecological management are significant. We argue that P. sylvestris should be considered native to Ireland, at least at this site. As Ireland’s only putative native P. sylvestris population and the western limit of the species’ native range, this site is of high conservation value and must be carefully managed and monitored. Seed-sourcing for ex-situ forest restoration must be compatible with the long-term viability of the population in-situ. View Full-Text
Keywords: conservation value; ecological management; forest ecology; native status; palaeoecology; Pinus sylvestris; pollen analysis; the Burren; woodland ecology conservation value; ecological management; forest ecology; native status; palaeoecology; Pinus sylvestris; pollen analysis; the Burren; woodland ecology
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Roche, J.R.; Mitchell, F.J.G.; Waldren, S.; Stefanini, B.S. Palaeoecological Evidence for Survival of Scots Pine through the Late Holocene in Western Ireland: Implications for Ecological Management. Forests 2018, 9, 350.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top