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Article

Model-Based Estimation of Amazonian Forests Recovery Time after Drought and Fire Events

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Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência Florestal, Universidade Federal Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri Campus JK, Diamantina 39100-000, MG, Brazil
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Federal Institute of Technology North of Minas Gerais (IFNMG), Diamantina 39100-000, MG, Brazil
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Department of Agriculture, University of Napoli Federico II, 80055 Portici (Naples), Italy
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Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, 03092 Panamá, Panama
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School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
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Institute of Geography, Federal University of Uberlandia (UFU), Av. João Naves de Ávila 2121, Uberlandia 38400-902, Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Woodwell Climate Research Center, Falmouth, MA 02540, USA
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Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da Amazônia, Canarana 78640-000, MT, Brazil
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Institute for Agriculture and Forestry Systems in the Mediterranean, National Research Council of Italy, 06128 Perugia, Italy
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Department of Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest Systems, University of Tuscia, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2021, 12(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010008
Received: 24 September 2020 / Revised: 15 December 2020 / Accepted: 21 December 2020 / Published: 23 December 2020
In recent decades, droughts, deforestation and wildfires have become recurring phenomena that have heavily affected both human activities and natural ecosystems in Amazonia. The time needed for an ecosystem to recover from carbon losses is a crucial metric to evaluate disturbance impacts on forests. However, little is known about the impacts of these disturbances, alone and synergistically, on forest recovery time and the resulting spatiotemporal patterns at the regional scale. In this study, we combined the 3-PG forest growth model, remote sensing and field derived equations, to map the Amazonia-wide (3 km of spatial resolution) impact and recovery time of aboveground biomass (AGB) after drought, fire and a combination of logging and fire. Our results indicate that AGB decreases by 4%, 19% and 46% in forests affected by drought, fire and logging + fire, respectively, with an average AGB recovery time of 27 years for drought, 44 years for burned and 63 years for logged + burned areas and with maximum values reaching 184 years in areas of high fire intensity. Our findings provide two major insights in the spatial and temporal patterns of drought and wildfire in the Amazon: (1) the recovery time of the forests takes longer in the southeastern part of the basin, and, (2) as droughts and wildfires become more frequent—since the intervals between the disturbances are getting shorter than the rate of forest regeneration—the long lasting damage they cause potentially results in a permanent and increasing carbon losses from these fragile ecosystems. View Full-Text
Keywords: Amazon; recovery time; aboveground biomass; climate change; 3-PG; fire; logging Amazon; recovery time; aboveground biomass; climate change; 3-PG; fire; logging
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MDPI and ACS Style

De Faria, B.L.; Marano, G.; Piponiot, C.; Silva, C.A.; Dantas, V.d.L.; Rattis, L.; Rech, A.R.; Collalti, A. Model-Based Estimation of Amazonian Forests Recovery Time after Drought and Fire Events. Forests 2021, 12, 8. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010008

AMA Style

De Faria BL, Marano G, Piponiot C, Silva CA, Dantas VdL, Rattis L, Rech AR, Collalti A. Model-Based Estimation of Amazonian Forests Recovery Time after Drought and Fire Events. Forests. 2021; 12(1):8. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010008

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Faria, Bruno L., Gina Marano, Camille Piponiot, Carlos A. Silva, Vinícius de L. Dantas, Ludmila Rattis, Andre R. Rech, and Alessio Collalti. 2021. "Model-Based Estimation of Amazonian Forests Recovery Time after Drought and Fire Events" Forests 12, no. 1: 8. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010008

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