Next Article in Journal
Ground-Dwelling Arthropod Community Responses to Recent and Repeated Wildfires in Conifer Forests of Northern New Mexico, USA
Next Article in Special Issue
Survival of Whitebark Pine Seedlings Grown from Direct Seeding: Implications for Regeneration and Restoration under Climate Change
Previous Article in Journal
Transcriptome Sequencing and Expression Analysis of Genes Related to Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Leaves of Malus ‘Profusion’ Infected by Japanese Apple Rust
Previous Article in Special Issue
Whitebark Pine Recruitment in Sierra Nevada Driven by Range Position and Disturbance History
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Climatic Correlates of White Pine Blister Rust Infection in Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

1
Greater Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network, National Park Service, Bozeman, MT 59715, USA
2
U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, Bozeman, MT 59715, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(8), 666; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10080666
Received: 29 June 2019 / Revised: 3 August 2019 / Accepted: 4 August 2019 / Published: 7 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Restoration of Whitebark Pine)
  |  
PDF [2907 KB, uploaded 7 August 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Whitebark pine, a foundation species at tree line in the Western U.S. and Canada, has declined due to native mountain pine beetle epidemics, wildfire, and white pine blister rust. These declines are concerning for the multitude of ecosystem and human benefits provided by this species. An understanding of the climatic correlates associated with spread is needed to successfully manage impacts from forest pathogens. Since 2000 mountain pine beetles have killed 75% of the mature cone-bearing trees in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, and 40.9% of monitored trees have been infected with white pine blister rust. We identified models of white pine blister rust infection which indicated that an August and September interaction between relative humidity and temperature are better predictors of white pine blister rust infection in whitebark pine than location and site characteristics in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The climate conditions conducive to white pine blister rust occur throughout the ecosystem, but larger trees in relatively warm and humid conditions were more likely to be infected between 2000 and 2018. We mapped the infection probability over the past two decades to identify coarse-scale patterns of climate conditions associated with white pine blister rust infection in whitebark pine. View Full-Text
Keywords: white pine blister rust; Cronartium ribicola; whitebark pine; Pinus albicaulis; Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem; relative humidity white pine blister rust; Cronartium ribicola; whitebark pine; Pinus albicaulis; Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem; relative humidity
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Thoma, D.P.; Shanahan, E.K.; Irvine, K.M. Climatic Correlates of White Pine Blister Rust Infection in Whitebark Pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Forests 2019, 10, 666.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top