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Article

The Colour of Tropical Woods Influenced by Brown Rot

Technical University in Zvolen, Faculty of Wood Sciences and Technology, T. G. Masaryka 24, Zvolen, SK 96001, Slovakia
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Forests 2019, 10(4), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10040322
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 31 March 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wood Properties and Processing)
Interesting aesthetic properties of tropical woods, like surface texture and colour, are rarely impaired due to weathering, rotting and other degradation processes. This study analyses the colour of 21 tropical woods before and after six weeks of intentional attack by the brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana. The CIEL*a*b* colour system was applied for measuring the lightness, redness and yellowness, and from these parameters the hue tone angle and colour saturation were calculated. Lighter tropical woods tended to appear a less red and a more yellow, and had a greater hue tone angle. However, for the original woods was not found dependence between the lightness and colour saturation. Tropical woods at attack by C. puteana lost a weight from 0.08% to 6.48%. The lightest and moderately light species—like okoumé, iroko, ovengol and sapelli—significantly darkened, while the darkest species—wengé and ipé—significantly lightened. The majority of tropical woods obtained a brighter shade of yellow, typically wengé, okoumé and blue gum, while some of them also a brighter shade of green, typically sapelli, padouk and macaranduba. C. puteana specifically affected the hue tone angle and colour saturation of tested tropical woods, but without an apparent changing the tendency of these colour parameters to lightness. The total colour difference of tested tropical woods significantly increased in connection with changes of their lightness (ΔE*ab = 5.92 − 0.50·ΔL*; R2 = 0.37), but it was not influenced by the red and yellow tint changes, and weight losses. View Full-Text
Keywords: tropical woods; brown rot; Coniophora puteana; colour; CIEL*a*b* system tropical woods; brown rot; Coniophora puteana; colour; CIEL*a*b* system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vidholdová, Z.; Reinprecht, L. The Colour of Tropical Woods Influenced by Brown Rot. Forests 2019, 10, 322. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10040322

AMA Style

Vidholdová Z, Reinprecht L. The Colour of Tropical Woods Influenced by Brown Rot. Forests. 2019; 10(4):322. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10040322

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vidholdová, Zuzana, and Ladislav Reinprecht. 2019. "The Colour of Tropical Woods Influenced by Brown Rot" Forests 10, no. 4: 322. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10040322

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