Next Article in Journal
Age, Growth and Death of a National Icon: The Historic Chapman Baobab of Botswana
Next Article in Special Issue
Phosphorus Availabilities Differ between Cropland and Forestland in Shelterbelt Systems
Previous Article in Journal
Functionalized Surface Layer on Poplar Wood Fabricated by Fire Retardant and Thermal Densification. Part 2: Dynamic Wettability and Bonding Strength
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Natural Capital Approach to Agroforestry Decision-Making at the Farm Scale
Open AccessReview

Temperate Agroforestry Systems and Insect Pollinators: A Review

1
Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service, National Agroforestry Center, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
2
Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Omaha, NE 68134, USA
3
Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Greensboro, NC 27401, USA
4
Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR 97232-1324 USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(11), 981; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110981
Received: 8 October 2019 / Revised: 31 October 2019 / Accepted: 1 November 2019 / Published: 5 November 2019
Agroforestry can provide ecosystem services and benefits such as soil erosion control, microclimate modification for yield enhancement, economic diversification, livestock production and well-being, and water quality protection. Through increased structural and functional diversity in agricultural landscapes, agroforestry practices can also affect ecosystem services provided by insect pollinators. A literature review was conducted to synthesize information on how temperate agroforestry systems influence insect pollinators and their pollination services with particular focus on the role of trees and shrubs. Our review indicates that agroforestry practices can provide three overarching benefits for pollinators: (1) providing habitat including foraging resources and nesting or egg-laying sites, (2) enhancing site and landscape connectivity, and (3) mitigating pesticide exposure. In some cases, agroforestry practices may contribute to unintended consequences such as becoming a sink for pollinators, where they may have increased exposure to pesticide residue that can accumulate in agroforestry practices. Although there is some scientific evidence suggesting that agroforestry practices can enhance crop pollination and yield, more research needs to be conducted on a variety of crops to verify this ecosystem service. Through a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of agroforestry practices on pollinators and their key services, we can better design agroforestry systems to provide these benefits in addition to other desired ecosystem services. View Full-Text
Keywords: alley cropping; bees; forest farming; hedgerows; pollinators; pollination; riparian buffers; shelterbelts; windbreaks alley cropping; bees; forest farming; hedgerows; pollinators; pollination; riparian buffers; shelterbelts; windbreaks
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Bentrup, G.; Hopwood, J.; Adamson, N.L.; Vaughan, M. Temperate Agroforestry Systems and Insect Pollinators: A Review. Forests 2019, 10, 981. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110981

AMA Style

Bentrup G, Hopwood J, Adamson NL, Vaughan M. Temperate Agroforestry Systems and Insect Pollinators: A Review. Forests. 2019; 10(11):981. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110981

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bentrup, Gary; Hopwood, Jennifer; Adamson, Nancy L.; Vaughan, Mace. 2019. "Temperate Agroforestry Systems and Insect Pollinators: A Review" Forests 10, no. 11: 981. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110981

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop