Next Article in Journal
Effect of the Particle Size and Matrix Strength on Strengthening and Damage Process of the Particle Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites
Next Article in Special Issue
Emerging Silk Material Trends: Repurposing, Phase Separation and Solution-Based Designs
Previous Article in Journal
Coaxial Monitoring of AISI 316L Thin Walls Fabricated by Direct Metal Laser Deposition
Previous Article in Special Issue
Silk Particles as Carriers of Therapeutic Molecules for Cancer Treatment
 
 
Review

Silk-Based Materials for Hard Tissue Engineering

by 1,†, 1,† and 1,2,3,4,5,*
1
Lehrstuhl Biomaterialien, Fakultät für Ingenieurwissenschaften, Universität Bayreuth, Prof.-Rüdiger-Bormann-Straße 1, 95447 Bayreuth, Germany
2
Bayreuther Zentrum für Kolloide und Grenzflächen (BZKG), Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany
3
Bayerisches Polymerinstitut (BPI), Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany
4
Bayreuther Zentrum für Molekulare Biowissenschaften (BZMB), Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany
5
Bayreuther Materialzentrum (BayMAT), Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Academic Editor: Francesco Baino
Materials 2021, 14(3), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14030674
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 25 January 2021 / Accepted: 26 January 2021 / Published: 1 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silk-Based Biomaterials)
Hard tissues, e.g., bone, are mechanically stiff and, most typically, mineralized. To design scaffolds for hard tissue regeneration, mechanical, physico-chemical and biological cues must align with those found in the natural tissue. Combining these aspects poses challenges for material and construct design. Silk-based materials are promising for bone tissue regeneration as they fulfill several of such necessary requirements, and they are non-toxic and biodegradable. They can be processed into a variety of morphologies such as hydrogels, particles and fibers and can be mineralized. Therefore, silk-based materials are versatile candidates for biomedical applications in the field of hard tissue engineering. This review summarizes silk-based approaches for mineralized tissue replacements, and how to find the balance between sufficient material stiffness upon mineralization and cell survival upon attachment as well as nutrient supply. View Full-Text
Keywords: silk fibroin; silk spidroin; biomineralization; composite materials; bone; teeth; cartilage; tendon silk fibroin; silk spidroin; biomineralization; composite materials; bone; teeth; cartilage; tendon
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Neubauer, V.J.; Döbl, A.; Scheibel, T. Silk-Based Materials for Hard Tissue Engineering. Materials 2021, 14, 674. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14030674

AMA Style

Neubauer VJ, Döbl A, Scheibel T. Silk-Based Materials for Hard Tissue Engineering. Materials. 2021; 14(3):674. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14030674

Chicago/Turabian Style

Neubauer, Vanessa J., Annika Döbl, and Thomas Scheibel. 2021. "Silk-Based Materials for Hard Tissue Engineering" Materials 14, no. 3: 674. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14030674

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop