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Stereolithographic Additive Manufacturing of High Precision Glass Ceramic Parts

Christian Doppler Laboratory for Photopolymers in Digital and Restorative Dentistry, TU Wien, Getreidemarkt 9, 1060 Vienna, Austria
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Materials 2020, 13(7), 1492; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071492 (registering DOI)
Received: 27 February 2020 / Revised: 19 March 2020 / Accepted: 23 March 2020 / Published: 25 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additive Manufacturing Materials and Their Applications)
Lithography based additive manufacturing (AM) is one of the most established and widely used 3D-printing processes. It has enabled the processing of many different materials from thermoplast-like polymers to ceramics that have outstanding feature resolutions and surface quality, with comparable properties of traditional materials. This work focuses on the processing of glass ceramics, which have high optical demands, precision and mechanical properties specifically suitable for dental replacements, such as crowns. Lithography-based ceramic manufacturing (LCM) has been chosen as the optimal manufacturing process where a light source with a defined wavelength is used to cure and structure ceramic filled photosensitive resins. In the case of glass ceramic powders, plastic flow during thermal processing might reduce the precision, as well as the commonly observed sintering shrinkage associated with the utilized temperature program. To reduce this problem, particular sinter structures have been developed to optimize the precision of 3D-printed glass ceramic crowns. To evaluate the precision of the final part, testing using digitizing methods from optical to tactile systems were utilized with the best results were obtained from micro computed tomography (CT) scanning. These methods resulted in an optimized process allowing for possible production of high precision molar crowns with dimensional accuracy and high reproducibility. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomedical engineering; additive manufacturing; stereolithography; micro CT; glass ceramic; dental replacement biomedical engineering; additive manufacturing; stereolithography; micro CT; glass ceramic; dental replacement
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Schönherr, J.A.; Baumgartner, S.; Hartmann, M.; Stampfl, J. Stereolithographic Additive Manufacturing of High Precision Glass Ceramic Parts. Materials 2020, 13, 1492.

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