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Open AccessArticle

Direct Energy Deposition of TiAl for Hybrid Manufacturing and Repair of Turbine Blades

1
Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (FhG-ILT), 52074 Aachen, Germany
2
Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, Institut für Werkstoff und Fuegetechnik, 39106 Magdeburg, Germany
3
Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany
4
Access e.V, 52072 Aachen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(19), 4392; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13194392
Received: 21 August 2020 / Revised: 3 September 2020 / Accepted: 9 September 2020 / Published: 1 October 2020
While repair is mainly used to restore the original part geometry and properties, hybrid manufacturing aims to exploit the benefits of each respective manufacturing process regarding either processing itself or resulting part characteristics. Especially with the current implementation of additive manufacturing in the production of TiAl, turbine blades for both hybrid manufacturing and repair new opportunities are enabled. One main issue is the compatibility of the two or more material types involved, which either differ regarding composition or microstructure or both. In this study, a TNMTM-alloy (Ti-Nb-Mo) was manufactured by different processes (casting, forging, laser additive manufacturing) and identically heat-treated at 1290 °C. Chemical compositions, especially aluminum and oxygen contents, were measured, and the resulting microstructures were analyzed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and High-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD). The properties were determined by hardness measurements and high-temperature compression tests. The comparison led to an overall assessment of the theoretical compatibility. Experiments to combine several processes were performed to evaluate the practical feasibility. Despite obvious differences in the final phase distribution caused by deviations in the chemical composition, the measured properties of the samples did not differ significantly. The feasibility of combining direct energy deposition (DED) with either casting or laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) was demonstrated by the successful build of the dense, crack-free hybrid material. View Full-Text
Keywords: titanium aluminides; additive manufacturing; microstructure; phase distribution; mechanical properties titanium aluminides; additive manufacturing; microstructure; phase distribution; mechanical properties
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rittinghaus, S.-K.; Schmelzer, J.; Rackel, M.W.; Hemes, S.; Vogelpoth, A.; Hecht, U.; Weisheit, A. Direct Energy Deposition of TiAl for Hybrid Manufacturing and Repair of Turbine Blades. Materials 2020, 13, 4392.

AMA Style

Rittinghaus S-K, Schmelzer J, Rackel MW, Hemes S, Vogelpoth A, Hecht U, Weisheit A. Direct Energy Deposition of TiAl for Hybrid Manufacturing and Repair of Turbine Blades. Materials. 2020; 13(19):4392.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rittinghaus, Silja-Katharina; Schmelzer, Janett; Rackel, Marcus W.; Hemes, Susanne; Vogelpoth, Andreas; Hecht, Ulrike; Weisheit, Andreas. 2020. "Direct Energy Deposition of TiAl for Hybrid Manufacturing and Repair of Turbine Blades" Materials 13, no. 19: 4392.

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