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Article

Effect of Clinoptilolite and Halloysite Addition on Biogas Production and Microbial Community Structure during Anaerobic Digestion

1
Department of Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, Institute of Microbiology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa 1, 02-096 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Mineralogy, Petrography and Geochemistry, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(18), 4127; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184127
Received: 4 August 2020 / Revised: 8 September 2020 / Accepted: 14 September 2020 / Published: 17 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zeolites: Synthesis, Properties and Applications)
The study presents a comparison of the influence of a clinoptilolite-rich rock—zeolite (commonly used for improving anaerobic digestion processes)—and a highly porous clay mineral, halloysite (mainly used for gas purification), on the biogas production process. Batch experiments showed that the addition of each mineral increased the efficiency of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of both sewage sludge and maize silage. However, halloysite generated 15% higher biogas production during maize silage transformation. Halloysite also contributed to a much higher reduction of chemical oxygen demand for both substrates (by ~8% for maize silage and ~14% for sewage sludge) and a higher reduction of volatile solids and total ammonia for maize silage (by ~8% and ~4%, respectively). Metagenomic analysis of the microbial community structure showed that the addition of both mineral sorbents influenced the presence of key members of archaea and bacteria occurring in a well-operated biogas reactor. The significant difference between zeolite and halloysite is that the latter promoted the immobilization of key methanogenic archaea Methanolinea (belong to Methanomicrobia class). Based on this result, we postulate that halloysite could be useful not only as a sorbent for (bio)gas treatment methodologies but also as an agent for improving biogas production. View Full-Text
Keywords: zeolite; halloysite; anaerobic digestion; biogas; microbial community; microorganisms immobilization; maize silage; sewage sludge zeolite; halloysite; anaerobic digestion; biogas; microbial community; microorganisms immobilization; maize silage; sewage sludge
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ciezkowska, M.; Bajda, T.; Decewicz, P.; Dziewit, L.; Drewniak, L. Effect of Clinoptilolite and Halloysite Addition on Biogas Production and Microbial Community Structure during Anaerobic Digestion. Materials 2020, 13, 4127. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184127

AMA Style

Ciezkowska M, Bajda T, Decewicz P, Dziewit L, Drewniak L. Effect of Clinoptilolite and Halloysite Addition on Biogas Production and Microbial Community Structure during Anaerobic Digestion. Materials. 2020; 13(18):4127. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184127

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ciezkowska, Martyna, Tomasz Bajda, Przemyslaw Decewicz, Lukasz Dziewit, and Lukasz Drewniak. 2020. "Effect of Clinoptilolite and Halloysite Addition on Biogas Production and Microbial Community Structure during Anaerobic Digestion" Materials 13, no. 18: 4127. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184127

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