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Article

Molecular Dynamics as a Means to Investigate Grain Size and Strain Rate Effect on Plastic Deformation of 316 L Nanocrystalline Stainless-Steel

1
State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050, China
2
Department of physics, Faculty of science and technology, University of Shendi, Shendi P.O. Box 407, Sudan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(14), 3223; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143223
Received: 24 June 2020 / Revised: 15 July 2020 / Accepted: 16 July 2020 / Published: 20 July 2020
In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the effect of strain rate on the plastic deformation mechanism of nanocrystalline 316 L stainless-steel, wherein there was an average grain of 2.5–11.5 nm at room temperature. The results showed that the critical grain size was 7.7 nm. Below critical grain size, grain boundary activation was dominant (i.e., grain boundary sliding and grain rotation). Above critical grain size, dislocation activities were dominant. There was a slight effect that occurred during the plastic deformation mechanism transition from dislocation-based plasticity to grain boundaries, as a result of the stress rate on larger grain sizes. There was also a greater sensitive on the strain rate for smaller grain sizes than the larger grain sizes. We chose samples of 316 L nanocrystalline stainless-steel with mean grain sizes of 2.5, 4.1, and 9.9 nm. The values of strain rate sensitivity were 0.19, 0.22, and 0.14, respectively. These values indicated that small grain sizes in the plastic deformation mechanism, such as grain boundary sliding and grain boundary rotation, were sensitive to strain rates bigger than those of the larger grain sizes. We found that the stacking fault was formed by partial dislocation in all samples. These stacking faults were obstacles to partial dislocation emission in more sensitive stress rates. Additionally, the results showed that mechanical properties such as yield stress and flow stress increased by increasing the strain rate. View Full-Text
Keywords: strain rate; 316 L austenitic stainless-steel; grain size; plastic deformation mechanisms; molecular dynamics; embedded atom method (EAM) strain rate; 316 L austenitic stainless-steel; grain size; plastic deformation mechanisms; molecular dynamics; embedded atom method (EAM)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Husain, A.; La, P.; Hongzheng, Y.; Jie, S. Molecular Dynamics as a Means to Investigate Grain Size and Strain Rate Effect on Plastic Deformation of 316 L Nanocrystalline Stainless-Steel. Materials 2020, 13, 3223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143223

AMA Style

Husain A, La P, Hongzheng Y, Jie S. Molecular Dynamics as a Means to Investigate Grain Size and Strain Rate Effect on Plastic Deformation of 316 L Nanocrystalline Stainless-Steel. Materials. 2020; 13(14):3223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143223

Chicago/Turabian Style

Husain, Abdelrahim, Peiqing La, Yue Hongzheng, and Sheng Jie. 2020. "Molecular Dynamics as a Means to Investigate Grain Size and Strain Rate Effect on Plastic Deformation of 316 L Nanocrystalline Stainless-Steel" Materials 13, no. 14: 3223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143223

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