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Article

Further Studies into Crack Growth in Additively Manufactured Materials

1
Computational Multiphysics Systems Laboratory, Center for Materials Physics and Technology, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA
2
Centre of Expertise for Structural Mechanics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
3
Structures Division, Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, MD 20670, USA
4
Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(10), 2223; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102223
Received: 31 March 2020 / Revised: 19 April 2020 / Accepted: 23 April 2020 / Published: 12 May 2020
Understanding and characterizing crack growth is central to meeting the damage tolerance and durability requirements delineated in USAF Structures Bulletin EZ-SB-19-01 for the utilization of additive manufacturing (AM) in the sustainment of aging aircraft. In this context, the present paper discusses the effect of different AM processes, different build directions, and the variability in the crack growth rates related to AM Ti-6Al-4V, AM Inconel 625, and AM 17-4 PH stainless steel. This study reveals that crack growth in these three AM materials can be captured using the Hartman–Schijve crack growth equation and that the variability in the various da/dN versus ΔK curves can be modeled by allowing the terms ΔKthr and A to vary. It is also shown that for the AM Ti-6AL-4V processes considered, the variability in the cyclic fracture toughness appears to be greatest for specimens manufactured using selective layer melting (SLM). View Full-Text
Keywords: additive manufacture; aircraft sustainment; fatigue; Structures Bulletin EZ-SB-19-01; MIL-STD-1530D additive manufacture; aircraft sustainment; fatigue; Structures Bulletin EZ-SB-19-01; MIL-STD-1530D
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MDPI and ACS Style

Iliopoulos, A.P.; Jones, R.; Michopoulos, J.G.; Phan, N.; Rans, C. Further Studies into Crack Growth in Additively Manufactured Materials. Materials 2020, 13, 2223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102223

AMA Style

Iliopoulos AP, Jones R, Michopoulos JG, Phan N, Rans C. Further Studies into Crack Growth in Additively Manufactured Materials. Materials. 2020; 13(10):2223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102223

Chicago/Turabian Style

Iliopoulos, Athanasios P., Rhys Jones, John G. Michopoulos, Nam Phan, and Calvin Rans. 2020. "Further Studies into Crack Growth in Additively Manufactured Materials" Materials 13, no. 10: 2223. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102223

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