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Open AccessArticle

Improvement of Compressibility and Thaw-Settlement Properties of Warm and Ice-Rich Frozen Soil with Cement and Additives

State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China
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Materials 2019, 12(7), 1068; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071068
Received: 11 March 2019 / Revised: 27 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 1 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Construction and Building Materials)
The warm and ice-rich frozen soil (WIRFS) that underlies roadway embankments in permafrost regions exhibit large compression and thaw deformation, which can trigger a series of distresses. Cement and additives were used in this study to improve the compressibility and thaw-settlement properties of WIRFS. We, therefore, selected optimum additives and studied the improvement effect on the frozen soil with 30% water content based on our previous research. Given constant load and variable temperatures, compression coefficients, thaw strains, and water content changes were obtained at temperatures of −1.0 °C, −0.5 °C, and 2.0 °C to evaluate the effect of improvements. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was then used to observe the microstructure of improved soils and analyze causal mechanisms. Data show that hydration reactions, physical absorptions, cement, and additives formed new structures and changed the phase of water in frozen soil after curing at −1.0 °C for 28 days. This new structure, cemented with soil particles, unfrozen water, and ice, filled in the voids of frozen soil and effectively decreased the WIRFS compression coefficient and thaw strain. View Full-Text
Keywords: permafrost; compression coefficient; scanning electron microscope (SEM); thaw strain; calcium silicate hydrate permafrost; compression coefficient; scanning electron microscope (SEM); thaw strain; calcium silicate hydrate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chai, M.; Zhang, J. Improvement of Compressibility and Thaw-Settlement Properties of Warm and Ice-Rich Frozen Soil with Cement and Additives. Materials 2019, 12, 1068. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071068

AMA Style

Chai M, Zhang J. Improvement of Compressibility and Thaw-Settlement Properties of Warm and Ice-Rich Frozen Soil with Cement and Additives. Materials. 2019; 12(7):1068. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071068

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chai, Mingtang; Zhang, Jianming. 2019. "Improvement of Compressibility and Thaw-Settlement Properties of Warm and Ice-Rich Frozen Soil with Cement and Additives" Materials 12, no. 7: 1068. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071068

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