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Prototype Orthopedic Bone Plates 3D Printed by Laser Melting Deposition

1
Center for Advanced Laser Technologies—CETAL, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov, Romania
2
Faculty of Applied Sciences, Department of Physics University Politehnica of Bucharest, 060042 Bucharest, Romania
3
National Institute of Materials Physics, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov, Romania
4
Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2019, 12(6), 906; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12060906
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 March 2019 / Published: 19 March 2019
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Abstract

Laser melting deposition is a 3D printing method usually studied for the manufacturing of machine parts in the industry. However, for the medical sector, although feasible, applications and actual products taking advantage of this technique are only scarcely reported. Therefore, in this study, Ti6Al4V orthopedic implants in the form of plates were 3D printed by laser melting deposition. Tuning of the laser power, scanning speed and powder feed rate was conducted, in order to obtain a continuous deposition after a single laser pass and to diminish unwanted blown powder, stuck in the vicinity of the printed elements. The fabrication of bone plates is presented in detail, putting emphasis on the scanning direction, which had a decisive role in the 3D printing resolution. The printed material was investigated by optical microscopy and was found to be dense, with no visible pores or cracks. The metallographic investigations and X-ray diffraction data exposed an unusual biphasic α+β structure. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed a composition very similar to the one of the starting powder material. The mapping of the surface showed a uniform distribution of elements, with no segregations or areas with deficient elemental distribution. The in vitro tests performed on the 3D printed Ti6Al4V samples in osteoblast-like cell cultures up to 7 days showed that the material deposited by laser melting is cytocompatible. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ti6Al4V bone plates; laser melting deposition; titanium alloys; CAD-CAM design; in vitro testing Ti6Al4V bone plates; laser melting deposition; titanium alloys; CAD-CAM design; in vitro testing
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Chioibasu, D.; Achim, A.; Popescu, C.; Stan, G.E.; Pasuk, I.; Enculescu, M.; Iosub, S.; Duta, L.; Popescu, A. Prototype Orthopedic Bone Plates 3D Printed by Laser Melting Deposition. Materials 2019, 12, 906.

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