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Open AccessArticle

Real-Time Corrosion Monitoring of AISI 1010 Carbon Steel with Metal Surface Mapping in Sulfolane

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Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, Szkolna 9, 40-007 Katowice, Poland
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Institute of Materials Science, University of Silesia, 75 Pulku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzow, Poland
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Institute of Water and Wastewater Engineering, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego 18, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
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Honeywell Process Solutions, 11201 Greens Crossing Blvd, Suite 700 Houston, TX 77067, USA
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Department of Energy Saving and Air Protection, Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarkow 1, 40-166 Katowice, Poland
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Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Ilkovicova 6, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3276; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193276
Received: 19 August 2019 / Revised: 2 October 2019 / Accepted: 3 October 2019 / Published: 8 October 2019
Solvents are widely used in organic synthesis. Sulfolane is a five-membered heterocyclic organosulfur sulfone (R-SO2-R’, where R/R’ is alkyl, alkenyl, or aryl) and an anthropogenic medium commonly used as industrial extractive solvent in the liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor extraction processes. Under standard conditions sulfolane is not aggressive towards steel, but at higher temperatures and in oxygen, water, or chlorides presence, it can be decomposed into some corrosive (by-)products with generation of SO2 and subsequent formation of corrosive H2SO3. This pilot-case study provides data from laboratory measurements performed in low conductivity sulfolane-based fluids using an industrial multi-electrochemical technique for reliable detection of corrosion processes. In particular, a comprehensive evaluation of the aqueous phase impact on general and localized corrosion of AISI 1010 carbon steel in sulfolane is presented. Assessment of corrosive damage was carried out using an open circuit potential method, potentiodynamic polarization curves, SEM/EDS and scanning Kelvin probe technique. It was found that an increase in the water content (1–3 vol.%) in sulfolane causes a decrease in the corrosion resistance of AISI 1010 carbon steel on both uniform and pitting corrosion due to higher conductance of the sulfolane-based fluids. View Full-Text
Keywords: aprotic solvent; carbon steel; low-conductivity corrosion rate; electrochemical techniques; real-time corrosion monitoring; sulfolane aprotic solvent; carbon steel; low-conductivity corrosion rate; electrochemical techniques; real-time corrosion monitoring; sulfolane
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Bak, A.; Losiewicz, B.; Kozik, V.; Kubisztal, J.; Dybal, P.; Swietlicka, A.; Barbusinski, K.; Kus, S.; Howaniec, N.; Jampilek, J. Real-Time Corrosion Monitoring of AISI 1010 Carbon Steel with Metal Surface Mapping in Sulfolane. Materials 2019, 12, 3276.

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