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Open AccessArticle

Optimized Dental Implant Fixture Design for the Desirable Stress Distribution in the Surrounding Bone Region: A Biomechanical Analysis

1
Clinical Translational Research Center for Dental Science, Seoul National University Dental Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Korea
3
Bio-based Chemistry Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Ulsan 44429, Korea
4
Global Academy of Osseointegration, Seoul 03080, Korea
5
Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2749; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172749
Received: 5 August 2019 / Revised: 21 August 2019 / Accepted: 26 August 2019 / Published: 27 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimal Design of Materials and Structures)
The initial stability of a dental implant is known to be an indicator of osseointegration at immediate loading upon insertion. Implant designs have a fundamental role in the initial stability. Although new designs with advanced surface technology have been suggested for the initial stability of implant systems, verification is not simple because of various assessment factors. Our study focused on comparing the initial stability between two different implant systems via design aspects. A simulated model corresponding to the first molar derived from the mandibular bone was constructed. Biomechanical characteristics between the two models were compared by finite element analysis (FEA). Mechanical testing was also performed to derive the maximum loads for the two implant systems. CMI IS-III active (IS-III) had a more desirable stress distribution than CMI IS-II active (IS-II) in the surrounding bone region. Moreover, IS-III decreased the stress transfer to the nerve under the axial loading direction more than IS-II. Changes of implant design did not affect the maximum load. Our analyses suggest that the optimized design (IS-III), which has a bigger bone volume without loss of initial fixation, may minimize the bone damage during fixture insertion and we expect greater effectiveness in older patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: implant design; dental implants; biomechanics; finite element analysis; primary stability; dental nerve implant design; dental implants; biomechanics; finite element analysis; primary stability; dental nerve
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Kim, W.H.; Lee, J.-C.; Lim, D.; Heo, Y.-K.; Song, E.-S.; Lim, Y.-J.; Kim, B. Optimized Dental Implant Fixture Design for the Desirable Stress Distribution in the Surrounding Bone Region: A Biomechanical Analysis. Materials 2019, 12, 2749.

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