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Materials 2018, 11(11), 2216; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11112216

Does Delayed Restoration Improve Shear Bond Strength of Different Restorative Protocols to Calcium Silicate-Based Cements?

Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal
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Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 27 October 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to assess the proper time to perform a restoration (immediately or delayed) after placement of two calcium silicate-based cements (CSCs) and to test the performance of two different restorative protocols regarding shear bond strength (SBS). Seventy-five acrylic blocks were randomly divided into five groups (n = 15). Specimens were filled with either ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Biodentine (Septodont). The restoration was performed at an immediate (12 min) or delayed (seven days) timeframe, using a resin-based flowable composite (SDR) (bonded to the CSC using a universal bonding system) or glass ionomer cement (GIC) as restorative materials. SBS was measured using a universal testing machine. Fractured surfaces were evaluated, and the pattern was registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the Dunn–Sidak post hoc test (P < 0.05). Biodentine/immediate SDR showed the highest mean SBS value (4.44 MPa), with statistically significant differences when compared to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)/GIC (1.14 MPa) and MTA/immediate SDR (1.33 MPa). MTA/GIC and MTA/immediate SDR did not present significant differences regarding SBS. No statistical differences were verified concerning mean SBS between both CSCs within the 7 day groups. MTA/delayed SDR (3.86 MPa) presented statistical differences compared to MTA/immediate SDR, whereas no differences were observed regarding Biodentine performance (Biodentine/immediate SDR and Biodentine/delayed SDR (3.09 MPa)). Bonding procedures directly on top of MTA might be preferably performed at a delayed timeframe, whereas Biodentine might allow for immediate restoration. View Full-Text
Keywords: Biodentine; calcium silicate-based cements; mineral trioxide aggregate; regenerative endodontic procedures; shear bond strength; universal bonding agent Biodentine; calcium silicate-based cements; mineral trioxide aggregate; regenerative endodontic procedures; shear bond strength; universal bonding agent
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Palma, P.J.; Marques, J.A.; Falacho, R.I.; Vinagre, A.; Santos, J.M.; Ramos, J.C. Does Delayed Restoration Improve Shear Bond Strength of Different Restorative Protocols to Calcium Silicate-Based Cements? Materials 2018, 11, 2216.

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