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Open AccessReview

Biometric Data as Real-Time Measure of Physiological Reactions to Environmental Stimuli in the Built Environment

Chair of Building Technology and Climate Responsive Design, Department of Architecture, Technical University of Munich, 80333 München, Germany
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Energies 2021, 14(1), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14010232
Received: 1 December 2020 / Revised: 24 December 2020 / Accepted: 28 December 2020 / Published: 4 January 2021
The physiological and cognitive effects of environmental stimuli from the built environment on humans have been studied for more than a century, over short time frames in terms of comfort, and over long-time frames in terms of health and wellbeing. The strong interdependence of objective and subjective factors in these fields of study has traditionally involved the necessity to rely on a number of qualitative sources of information, as self-report variables, which however, raise criticisms concerning their reliability and precision. Recent advancements in sensing technology and data processing methodologies have strongly contributed towards a renewed interest in biometric data as a potential high-precision tool to study the physiological effects of selected stimuli on humans using more objective and real-time measures. Within this context, this review reports on a broader spectrum of available and advanced biosensing techniques used in the fields of building engineering, human physiology, neurology, and psychology. The interaction and interdependence between (i) indoor environmental parameters and (ii) biosignals identifying human physiological response to the environmental stressors are systematically explored. Online databases ScienceDirect, Scopus, MDPI and ResearchGate were scanned to gather all relevant publications in the last 20 years, identifying and listing tools and methods of biometric data collection, assessing the potentials and drawbacks of the most relevant techniques. The review aims to support the introduction of biomedical signals as a tool for understanding the physiological aspects of indoor comfort in the view of achieving an improved balance between human resilience and building resilience, addressing human indoor health as well as energetic and environmental building performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: biometric data; biosignals; non-intrusive sensing; physiological metrics; environmental stimuli; stress detection; health; comfort biometric data; biosignals; non-intrusive sensing; physiological metrics; environmental stimuli; stress detection; health; comfort
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MDPI and ACS Style

Persiani, S.G.L.; Kobas, B.; Koth, S.C.; Auer, T. Biometric Data as Real-Time Measure of Physiological Reactions to Environmental Stimuli in the Built Environment. Energies 2021, 14, 232. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14010232

AMA Style

Persiani SGL, Kobas B, Koth SC, Auer T. Biometric Data as Real-Time Measure of Physiological Reactions to Environmental Stimuli in the Built Environment. Energies. 2021; 14(1):232. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14010232

Chicago/Turabian Style

Persiani, Sandra G.L.; Kobas, Bilge; Koth, Sebastian C.; Auer, Thomas. 2021. "Biometric Data as Real-Time Measure of Physiological Reactions to Environmental Stimuli in the Built Environment" Energies 14, no. 1: 232. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14010232

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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