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Study on Heat Utilization in an Attached Sunspace in a House with a Central Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning System

1
Department of Architecture, The University of Kitakyushu, Kitakyushu 808-0135, Japan
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School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu 610106, China
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Department of Architecture and Urban Design, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto 603-8577, Japan
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Tohata Architects & Engineers, Osaka 541-0043, Japan
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Faculty of Engineering, Shonan Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 251-0046, Japan
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Department of Architecture and Urban Design, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-0053, Japan
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School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Jilin Jianzhu University, Changchun 130118, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2018, 11(5), 1192; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051192
Received: 11 March 2018 / Revised: 3 May 2018 / Accepted: 5 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
Based on numerical simulations, the heating load reduction effect of an attached sunspace in winter was determined, and the effective heat utilization method and sunspace design were explored. In this paper, we studied the heating load reduction effect using heat from the sunspace and temperature fluctuation of each room at the time of heat use from the sunspace (sending air from the sunspace to the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) machine room and taking the air to the adjacent rooms). In the case of the all-day HVAC system, it was confirmed that a larger capacity of sunspace and not sending air from the sunspace to the adjacent room demonstrated a better heating-load reduction effect. Compared with Model Iw (a house with a window on the exterior of the sunspace opened to external air), Model I (a house with an attached sunspace on the second floor) could save approximately 41% of the total energy. Model II (a house with the attached sunspace both on the first and second floors) could save approximately 84% of the total energy. Sending heat from the sunspace to the adjacent room led to temperature increases in the adjacent rooms. However, if the construction plan is to have the sunspace only on the second floor, the house should be carefully designed, for example, by placing a living room on the second floor. View Full-Text
Keywords: air circulation system; attached sunspace; heating load reduction; numerical simulation air circulation system; attached sunspace; heating load reduction; numerical simulation
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Ma, Q.; Fukuda, H.; Lee, M.; Kobatake, T.; Kuma, Y.; Ozaki, A.; Wei, X. Study on Heat Utilization in an Attached Sunspace in a House with a Central Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning System. Energies 2018, 11, 1192.

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