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Review

Cognitive Assessment Tools Recommended in Geriatric Oncology Guidelines: A Rapid Review

1
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
2
Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Box Hill, VIC 3128, Australia
3
Cancer Services, Eastern Health, Box Hill, VIC 3128, Australia
4
Aged Medicine Program, Eastern Health, Box Hill, VIC 3128, Australia
5
Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
6
Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane City, QLD 4000, Australia
7
University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(5), 3987-4003; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050339
Received: 28 August 2021 / Revised: 24 September 2021 / Accepted: 4 October 2021 / Published: 8 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Care for Older Adults with Cancer)
Cognitive assessment is a cornerstone of geriatric care. Cognitive impairment has the potential to significantly impact multiple phases of a person’s cancer care experience. Accurately identifying this vulnerability is a challenge for many cancer care clinicians, thus the use of validated cognitive assessment tools are recommended. As international cancer guidelines for older adults recommend Geriatric Assessment (GA) which includes an evaluation of cognition, clinicians need to be familiar with the overall interpretation of the commonly used cognitive assessment tools. This rapid review investigated the cognitive assessment tools that were most frequently recommended by Geriatric Oncology guidelines: Blessed Orientation-Memory-Concentration test (BOMC), Clock Drawing Test (CDT), Mini-Cog, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ). A detailed appraisal of the strengths and limitations of each tool was conducted, with a focus on practical aspects of implementing cognitive assessment tools into real-world clinical settings. Finally, recommendations on choosing an assessment tool and the additional considerations beyond screening are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: aged; medical oncology/standards; geriatric assessment/methods; cognition/physiology; cognitive dysfunction/diagnosis; dementia/diagnosis; screening; clinical decision-making aged; medical oncology/standards; geriatric assessment/methods; cognition/physiology; cognitive dysfunction/diagnosis; dementia/diagnosis; screening; clinical decision-making
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tuch, G.; Soo, W.K.; Luo, K.-Y.; Frearson, K.; Oh, E.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Agar, M.; Lane, H. Cognitive Assessment Tools Recommended in Geriatric Oncology Guidelines: A Rapid Review. Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28, 3987-4003. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050339

AMA Style

Tuch G, Soo WK, Luo K-Y, Frearson K, Oh EL, Phillips JL, Agar M, Lane H. Cognitive Assessment Tools Recommended in Geriatric Oncology Guidelines: A Rapid Review. Current Oncology. 2021; 28(5):3987-4003. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050339

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tuch, Gina, Wee K. Soo, Ki-Yung Luo, Kinglsey Frearson, Ek L. Oh, Jane L. Phillips, Meera Agar, and Heather Lane. 2021. "Cognitive Assessment Tools Recommended in Geriatric Oncology Guidelines: A Rapid Review" Current Oncology 28, no. 5: 3987-4003. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050339

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