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Article

Older Adults’ Experiences of a Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Intervention: A Nested Qualitative Study in the SITLESS Multi-Country Randomised Clinical Trial

1
Institute of Nursing and Health Research, School of Health Sciences, Ulster University, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, UK
2
Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Center for Active and Healthy Ageing (CAHA), University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense M, Denmark
3
Institute of Mental Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Ulster University, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, UK
4
Department of Sport Sciences, Faculty of Psychology, Education and Sport Sciences Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
5
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, 08025 Barcelona, Spain
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Fundació Salut i Envelliment (Foundation on Health and Ageing)-UAB, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08041 Barcelona, Spain
7
Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, Ulm University, 89075 Ulm, Germany
8
Agaplesion Bethesda Clinic, Geriatric Research Unit Ulm University and Geriatric Center, 89073 Ulm, Germany
9
Research Group on Methodology, Methods, Models and Outcome of Health and Social Sciences (M3O), Faculty of Health Sciences and Welfare, University of Vic-Central University of Catalonia (UVIC-UCC), 08500 Vic, Spain
10
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
11
Sport and Exercise Sciences Research Institute, School of Sport, Ulster University, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, UK
12
Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment (HEHTA), Institute of Health and Well-Being (IHW), University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8RZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Membership of the SITLESS Group is provided in the Acknowledgments.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4730; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094730
Received: 23 March 2021 / Revised: 24 April 2021 / Accepted: 25 April 2021 / Published: 29 April 2021
Background: The SITLESS programme comprises exercise referral schemes and self-management strategies and has been evaluated in a trial in Denmark, Spain, Germany and Northern Ireland. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand the implementation and contextual aspects of the intervention in relation to the mechanisms of impact and to explore the perceived effects. Methods: Qualitative methodologies were nested in the SITLESS trial including 71 individual interviews and 12 focus groups targeting intervention and control group participants from postintervention to 18-month follow-up in all intervention sites based on a semi-structured topic guide. Results: Overarching themes were identified under the framework categories of context, implementation, mechanisms of impact and perceived effects. The findings highlight the perceived barriers and facilitators to older adults’ engagement in exercise referral schemes. Social interaction and enjoyment through the group-based programmes are key components to promote adherence and encourage the maintenance of targeted behaviours through peer support and connectedness. Exit strategies and signposting to relevant classes and facilities enabled the maintenance of positive lifestyle behaviours. Conclusions: When designing and implementing interventions, key components enhancing social interaction, enjoyment and continuity should be in place in order to successfully promote sustained behaviour change. View Full-Text
Keywords: exercise referral schemes; qualitative study; behaviour change; sedentary behaviour; physical activity; ageing exercise referral schemes; qualitative study; behaviour change; sedentary behaviour; physical activity; ageing
MDPI and ACS Style

Blackburn, N.E.; Skjodt, M.; Tully, M.A.; Mc Mullan, I.; Giné-Garriga, M.; Caserotti, P.; Blancafort, S.; Santiago, M.; Rodriguez-Garrido, S.; Weinmayr, G.; John-Köhler, U.; Wirth, K.; Jerez-Roig, J.; Dallmeier, D.; Wilson, J.J.; Deidda, M.; McIntosh, E.; Coll-Planas, L.; on behalf of the SITLESS Group. Older Adults’ Experiences of a Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Intervention: A Nested Qualitative Study in the SITLESS Multi-Country Randomised Clinical Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4730. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094730

AMA Style

Blackburn NE, Skjodt M, Tully MA, Mc Mullan I, Giné-Garriga M, Caserotti P, Blancafort S, Santiago M, Rodriguez-Garrido S, Weinmayr G, John-Köhler U, Wirth K, Jerez-Roig J, Dallmeier D, Wilson JJ, Deidda M, McIntosh E, Coll-Planas L, on behalf of the SITLESS Group. Older Adults’ Experiences of a Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Intervention: A Nested Qualitative Study in the SITLESS Multi-Country Randomised Clinical Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4730. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094730

Chicago/Turabian Style

Blackburn, Nicole E., Mathias Skjodt, Mark A. Tully, Ilona Mc Mullan, Maria Giné-Garriga, Paolo Caserotti, Sergi Blancafort, Marta Santiago, Sara Rodriguez-Garrido, Gudrun Weinmayr, Ulrike John-Köhler, Katharina Wirth, Javier Jerez-Roig, Dhayana Dallmeier, Jason J. Wilson, Manuela Deidda, Emma McIntosh, Laura Coll-Planas, and on behalf of the SITLESS Group. 2021. "Older Adults’ Experiences of a Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Intervention: A Nested Qualitative Study in the SITLESS Multi-Country Randomised Clinical Trial" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 9: 4730. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094730

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