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Article

Building Capacity in Monitoring Urban Liveability in Bangkok: Critical Success Factors and Reflections from a Multi-Sectoral, International Partnership

1
Centre for Urban Research, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
2
Office of the Permanent Secretary, Bangkok Metropolitan Administration, Phranakhon, Bangkok 10200, Thailand
3
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
4
Iain Butterworth & Associates, Kyneton, VIC 3444, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gabriel Gulis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7322; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147322
Received: 1 June 2021 / Revised: 2 July 2021 / Accepted: 2 July 2021 / Published: 8 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
Cities are widely recognised as important settings for promoting health. Nonetheless, making cities more liveable and supportive of health and wellbeing remains a challenge. Decision-makers’ capacity to use urban health evidence to create more liveable cities is fundamental to achieving these goals. This paper describes an international partnership designed to build capacity in using liveability indicators aligned with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and social determinants of health, in Bangkok, Thailand. The aim of this paper is to reflect on this partnership and outline factors critical to its success. Partners included the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration, the UN Global Compact—Cities Programme, the Victorian Government Department of Health and Human Services, the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, and urban scholars based at an Australian university. Numerous critical success factors were identified, including having a bilingual liaison and champion, establishment of two active working groups in the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration, and incorporating a six-month hand-over period. Other successful outcomes included contextualising liveability for diverse contexts, providing opportunities for reciprocal learning and knowledge exchange, and informing a major Bangkok strategic urban planning initiative. Future partnerships should consider the strategies identified here to maximise the success and longevity of capacity-building partnerships. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable development; low-to-middle income countries; social determinants; Thailand; global health; urban planning; capacity building; partnerships sustainable development; low-to-middle income countries; social determinants; Thailand; global health; urban planning; capacity building; partnerships
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alderton, A.; Nitvimol, K.; Davern, M.; Higgs, C.; Correia, J.; Butterworth, I.; Badland, H. Building Capacity in Monitoring Urban Liveability in Bangkok: Critical Success Factors and Reflections from a Multi-Sectoral, International Partnership. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7322. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147322

AMA Style

Alderton A, Nitvimol K, Davern M, Higgs C, Correia J, Butterworth I, Badland H. Building Capacity in Monitoring Urban Liveability in Bangkok: Critical Success Factors and Reflections from a Multi-Sectoral, International Partnership. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7322. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147322

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alderton, Amanda, Kornsupha Nitvimol, Melanie Davern, Carl Higgs, Joana Correia, Iain Butterworth, and Hannah Badland. 2021. "Building Capacity in Monitoring Urban Liveability in Bangkok: Critical Success Factors and Reflections from a Multi-Sectoral, International Partnership" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7322. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147322

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