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Article

Adolescent-Reported Food Insecurity: Correlates of Dietary Intake and School Lunch Behavior

1
Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Duke Center for Childhood Obesity Research, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Box 3675 Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
2
Department of Sociology, Duke Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, Durham, NC 27708, USA
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6647; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126647
Received: 9 May 2021 / Revised: 16 June 2021 / Accepted: 17 June 2021 / Published: 21 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Much of what is known about food insecurity (FI) experiences for young people is based on caregiver report. As such, our understanding of relationships between youth FI and dietary intake (DI) may be limited, particularly among adolescents who often eat away from home. This study examined relationships between youth-reported past-month FI, past-week DI, and school lunch behavior. Data are from middle and high school participants in the 2019 Minnesota Student Survey (N = 125,375), one of the longest-running youth surveys in the US. Logistic regression assessed relationships between FI and DI, including fruit, vegetable, milk, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB), and fast food consumption, and school lunch behavior, adjusting for demographic, physical, and emotional health indicators. Past-month FI was associated with reduced odds of meeting minimum thresholds for daily fruit, vegetable, and milk intake, and increased odds of daily SSB and frequent fast food consumption. Among food-insecure students, no participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) or NSLP participation uncertainty was associated with increased odds of skipping lunch. Findings suggest the importance of clinical and community innovations to prevent the loss of nutritional quality in favor of energy density for youth and families experiencing FI. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent; dietary intake; food insecurity; free and reduced-price lunch; minnesota student survey; nutrition; diet-related health risks adolescent; dietary intake; food insecurity; free and reduced-price lunch; minnesota student survey; nutrition; diet-related health risks
MDPI and ACS Style

Duke, N.N. Adolescent-Reported Food Insecurity: Correlates of Dietary Intake and School Lunch Behavior. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6647. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126647

AMA Style

Duke NN. Adolescent-Reported Food Insecurity: Correlates of Dietary Intake and School Lunch Behavior. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(12):6647. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126647

Chicago/Turabian Style

Duke, Naomi N. 2021. "Adolescent-Reported Food Insecurity: Correlates of Dietary Intake and School Lunch Behavior" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 12: 6647. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126647

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