Next Article in Journal
Correlates of Poor Self-Assessed Health Status among Socially Disadvantaged Populations in Poland
Next Article in Special Issue
“A Woman Is a Puppet.” Women’s Disempowerment and Prenatal Anxiety in Pakistan: A Qualitative Study of Sources, Mitigators, and Coping Strategies for Anxiety in Pregnancy
Previous Article in Journal
Is Alcohol Consumption Associated with Poor Perceived Academic Performance? Survey of Undergraduates in Finland
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Scoping Review of the Health of Conflict-Induced Internally Displaced Women in Africa
Open AccessArticle

Understanding the Meaning of Conformity to Feminine Norms in Lifestyle Habits and Health: A Cluster Analysis

1
Faculty of Biomedicine, Psychology Department, Universidad Europea de Madrid, 28670 Madrid, Spain
2
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
3
Faculty of Psychology, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28223 Madrid, Spain
4
Faculty of Biomedicine, Nursing Department, Universidad Europea de Madrid, 28670 Madrid, Spain
5
Faculty of Medicine, Nursing Department, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28029 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1370; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041370
Received: 6 February 2020 / Accepted: 17 February 2020 / Published: 20 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women’s Empowerment and Women’s Health Outcomes)
Background: Gender roles impact different spheres of life and lead women to behavioral patterns and lifestyle habits associated with femininity, generating important differences between men and women in health. The present study analyzed relationships between conformity to the feminine norms and different lifestyle indicators: Educational level, marital status, alcohol consumption, tobacco consumption, sleeping hours, social support, and physical activity. Additionally, cluster analysis was developed in order to identify different patterns of gender role conformity. Methods: The sample was made up of 347 women age 18–70 from Spain. Data collection was conducted during 2014. Results: Multiple logistic regression analyses produced odds ratios showing that women with lower feminine role conformity were more likely to use tobacco and alcohol, but less likely to share their lives with someone. Cluster analysis found four different profiles of gender role conformity related to different patterns of alcohol consumption and marital status. Conclusions: Conformity to feminine norms was associated with basic affective conditions such as sharing life with others and with alcohol and tobacco consumption, but not with physical activity, social support, and sleep duration. Whereas tobacco and alcohol use have important health implications, public health systems should pay attention to gender-related variables in order to design and implement specific prevention programs. View Full-Text
Keywords: feminine role conformity; lifestyle; marital status; alcohol; tobacco feminine role conformity; lifestyle; marital status; alcohol; tobacco
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Esteban-Gonzalo, S.; Sik Ying Ho, P.; Aparicio-García, M.E.; Esteban-Gonzalo, L. Understanding the Meaning of Conformity to Feminine Norms in Lifestyle Habits and Health: A Cluster Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1370. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041370

AMA Style

Esteban-Gonzalo S, Sik Ying Ho P, Aparicio-García ME, Esteban-Gonzalo L. Understanding the Meaning of Conformity to Feminine Norms in Lifestyle Habits and Health: A Cluster Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(4):1370. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041370

Chicago/Turabian Style

Esteban-Gonzalo, Sara; Sik Ying Ho, Petula; Aparicio-García, Marta E.; Esteban-Gonzalo, Laura. 2020. "Understanding the Meaning of Conformity to Feminine Norms in Lifestyle Habits and Health: A Cluster Analysis" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 4: 1370. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041370

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop