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Open AccessArticle

Does Environmental Walkability Matter? The Role of Walkable Environment in Active Commuting

1
Department of Urban Planning, Keimyung University, 1095 Dalgubeol-daero, Dalseo-gu, Daegu 42601, Korea
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041261
Received: 22 January 2020 / Revised: 13 February 2020 / Accepted: 14 February 2020 / Published: 15 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Commuting and Active Transportation)
Since walkability plays an important role in active commuting, several cities are actively promoting its integration into urban and environmental planning policies. This study examined the association between walkability and active commuting in Seoul, Korea. A multilevel logistic regression model was used to examine the correlation between Walkability Score and the probability of active commuting after controlling for individual variables. The analysis used 129,044 individual samples nested within 424 administrative districts (dongs). In this study, three models were tested: Model 1 contained only individual variables, Model 2 contained individual variables and Walkability Score, and Model 3 included neighborhood-level variables in addition to the variables of Model 2. The results showed that the Walkability Score was significantly correlated with the odds of active commuting. Specifically, every additional one-point increase in Walkability Score was associated with 0.3% higher odds of active commuting (Model 2: odds ratio (OR) = 1.003, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.001–1.005; Model 3: OR = 1.003, 95% CI = 1.001–1.006). Additionally, public transportation density was also positively correlated with the odds of active commuting. The odds of active commuting were positively correlated with younger age, female, lower-income, and having no car. Based on the findings, policy recommendations in urban planning and design, transport engineering, and environmental planning are provided. View Full-Text
Keywords: active commuting; walking; cycling; Walk Score; Walkability Score, multilevel logistic regression model; geographic information system (GIS); Seoul active commuting; walking; cycling; Walk Score; Walkability Score, multilevel logistic regression model; geographic information system (GIS); Seoul
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Kim, E.J.; Kim, J.; Kim, H. Does Environmental Walkability Matter? The Role of Walkable Environment in Active Commuting. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1261.

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