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Open AccessArticle

Neonatal Mortality and Temperature in Two Northern Swedish Rural Parishes, 1860–1899—The Significance of Ethnicity and Gender

1
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden
2
Department of Sociology, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden
3
Department of Statistics, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden
4
Department of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1216; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041216
Received: 20 January 2020 / Revised: 10 February 2020 / Accepted: 11 February 2020 / Published: 13 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Health and Well-Being of Indigenous People)
The aim of this study was to analyze the association between season of birth and daily temperature for neonatal mortality in two Swedish rural parishes between 1860 and 1899. Further, we aimed to study whether the association varied according to ethnicity (indigenous Sami reindeer herders and non-Sami settlers) and gender. The source material for this study comprised digitized parish records from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, combined with local weather data provided by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Using a time event-history approach, we investigated the association between daily temperature (at birth and up to 28 days after birth) and the risk of neonatal death during the coldest months (November through March). The results showed that Sami neonatal mortality was highest during winter and that the Sami neonatal mortality risk decreased with higher temperatures on the day of birth. Male neonatal risk decreased with higher temperatures during the days following birth, while no effect of temperature was observed among female neonates. We conclude that weather vulnerability differed between genders and between the indigenous and non-indigenous populations. View Full-Text
Keywords: neonatal mortality; temperature; seasonality; indigenous population; gender; Sweden neonatal mortality; temperature; seasonality; indigenous population; gender; Sweden
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Karlsson, L.; Lundevaller, E.H.; Schumann, B. Neonatal Mortality and Temperature in Two Northern Swedish Rural Parishes, 1860–1899—The Significance of Ethnicity and Gender. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1216.

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