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Open AccessReview

Monitoring Neuromuscular Performance in Military Personnel

1
Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
2
College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9147; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239147
Received: 31 October 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 3 December 2020 / Published: 7 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Testing and Physical Conditioning for Tactical Populations)
A necessarily high standard for physical readiness in tactical environments is often accompanied by high incidences of injury due to overaccumulations of neuromuscular fatigue (NMF). To account for instances of overtraining stimulated by NMF, close monitoring of neuromuscular performance is warranted. Previously validated tests, such as the countermovement jump, are useful means for monitoring performance adaptations, resiliency to fatigue, and risk for injury. Performing such tests on force plates provides an understanding of the movement strategy used to obtain the resulting outcome (e.g., jump height). Further, force plates afford numerous objective tests that are valid and reliable for monitoring upper and lower extremity muscular strength and power (thus sensitive to NMF) with less fatiguing and safer methods than traditional one-repetition maximum assessments. Force plates provide numerous software and testing application options that can be applied to military’s training but, to be effective, requires the practitioners to have sufficient knowledge of their functions. Therefore, this review aims to explain the functions of force plate testing as well as current best practices for utilizing force plates in military settings and disseminate protocols for valid and reliable testing to collect key variables that translate to physical performance capacities. View Full-Text
Keywords: military personnel; force plates; neuromuscular fatigue; countermovement jump; drop jump; isometric-mid-thigh pull; squat jump; tactical athletes; soldiers military personnel; force plates; neuromuscular fatigue; countermovement jump; drop jump; isometric-mid-thigh pull; squat jump; tactical athletes; soldiers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Merrigan, J.J.; Stone, J.D.; Thompson, A.G.; Hornsby, W.G.; Hagen, J.A. Monitoring Neuromuscular Performance in Military Personnel. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9147. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239147

AMA Style

Merrigan JJ, Stone JD, Thompson AG, Hornsby WG, Hagen JA. Monitoring Neuromuscular Performance in Military Personnel. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(23):9147. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239147

Chicago/Turabian Style

Merrigan, Justin J.; Stone, Jason D.; Thompson, Andrew G.; Hornsby, W. G.; Hagen, Joshua A. 2020. "Monitoring Neuromuscular Performance in Military Personnel" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 23: 9147. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239147

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