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Article

Fruit and Vegetable Lesson Plan Pilot Intervention for Grade 5 Students from Southwestern Ontario

1
Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
2
Faculty of Education, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
3
Ontario Student Nutrition Program-Southwestern, Windsor, ON N8W 5C2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8422; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228422
Received: 2 October 2020 / Revised: 28 October 2020 / Accepted: 12 November 2020 / Published: 13 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Environment and Children’s Health)
The purpose was to create and assess the impact of food literacy curriculum alongside a centrally procured school snack program among grade five students in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Grade five students (N = 287) from five intervention and three controls schools participated in an 8-week food delivery program. In addition to the food delivery program, intervention schools received a resource kit and access to 42 multidisciplinary food literacy lesson plans using the produce delivered as part of the food delivery program. Participants completed matched pre- and post-test online surveys to assess fruit and vegetable intake, knowledge, preferences, and attitudes. Descriptive analyses and changes in scores between the intervention and control schools were assessed using one-way ANOVAs, paired samples t-tests, and McNemar’s tests. In total, there were 220 participants that completed both the pre- and post-test surveys. There was a significant improvement in fruit and vegetable intake (p = 0.038), yet no differences in knowledge of the recommended number of food group servings, knowledge of food groups, or fruit and vegetable preferences or attitudes were observed. Integrating nutrition lesson plans within core curricula classes (e.g., math, science, and literacy) can lead to modest increases in fruit and vegetable intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: fruit and vegetables; nutrition intervention; lesson plans; school health fruit and vegetables; nutrition intervention; lesson plans; school health
MDPI and ACS Style

Woodruff, S.J.; Beckford, C.; Segave, S. Fruit and Vegetable Lesson Plan Pilot Intervention for Grade 5 Students from Southwestern Ontario. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8422. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228422

AMA Style

Woodruff SJ, Beckford C, Segave S. Fruit and Vegetable Lesson Plan Pilot Intervention for Grade 5 Students from Southwestern Ontario. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(22):8422. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228422

Chicago/Turabian Style

Woodruff, Sarah J., Clinton Beckford, and Stephanie Segave. 2020. "Fruit and Vegetable Lesson Plan Pilot Intervention for Grade 5 Students from Southwestern Ontario" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 22: 8422. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228422

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