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Open AccessArticle

Healthy Lifestyle Behaviours Are Associated with Children’s Psychological Health: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
2
Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Ministry of Health, St Leonards 2065, Australia
3
Department of Health Systems and Populations, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Human Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde 2109, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7509; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207509
Received: 17 September 2020 / Revised: 9 October 2020 / Accepted: 13 October 2020 / Published: 15 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health of Child and Young People)
Protecting children’s mental health is important and studies have shown that diet and exercise can have a positive impact. There are limited data available, however, from representative populations of children on the relationship between regular healthy lifestyle behaviours and psychological health. Data were obtained from the New South Wales Child Population Health Survey, 2013–2014. Parents were asked about diet, physical activity and screen time behaviours and completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) for one child aged 5–15. Higher SDQ scores indicate poorer psychological health and risk for mental health problems. Multivariable linear and logistic regression examined the relationships among dietary consumption, physical activity, screen time and SDQ scores, adjusting for potential confounding. Meeting screen time recommendations was most strongly associated with a lower SDQ total difficulties score (5–10 years: −1.56 (−2.68, −0.44); 11–15 years: −2.12 (−3.11, −1.12)). Children and adolescents who met screen time recommendations were also significantly less likely to have any score in the at-risk range. Children and adolescents meeting vegetable intake guidelines had significantly lower total difficulties scores (5–10 years: −1.54 (−3.03, −0.05); 11–15 years: −1.19 (−3.60, −0.39)), as did adolescents meeting discretionary food guidelines (−1.16 (−2.14, −0.18)) and children consuming the recommended fruit intake (−1.26 (−2.42, −0.10)). Our findings indicate that more effective interventions to increase the proportion of young Australians who meet the guidelines for diet and screen time would contribute to protecting their mental health. View Full-Text
Keywords: children; adolescents; diet; physical activity; screen time; mental health; psychological factors children; adolescents; diet; physical activity; screen time; mental health; psychological factors
MDPI and ACS Style

Thomas, M.M.; Gugusheff, J.; Baldwin, H.J.; Gale, J.; Boylan, S.; Mihrshahi, S. Healthy Lifestyle Behaviours Are Associated with Children’s Psychological Health: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7509.

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