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Open AccessArticle

Great Expectations: A Qualitative Analysis of the Factors That Influence Affective Forecasts for Exercise

1
National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
2
School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Otago, Otago 9016, New Zealand
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 551; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020551
Received: 4 December 2019 / Revised: 5 January 2020 / Accepted: 9 January 2020 / Published: 15 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Mental Health)
The extent to which people expect to feel pleasure during exercise is proposed to influence an individual’s decision to be active. In order to identify the factors that shape this affective forecast for exercise, this study explored what people think about when creating their affective forecast for exercise. Thirty-one inactive participants provided an affective forecast for a moderate intensity exercise session using the global affective forecast questionnaire. Immediately after, they were asked a series of questions to verbally explain what they were thinking about in order to generate their forecast. Thematic analysis identified four themes relating to the exercise intensity, the exercise outcomes, the exercise environment, and the enjoyment of exercise that influenced affective forecast creation. Exercise practitioners should design strategies to manipulate these factors, and structure exercise environments to support a positive affective forecast and better motivate exercise participation. View Full-Text
Keywords: motivation; cognitive appraisal; affective responses; physical activity; behavior change motivation; cognitive appraisal; affective responses; physical activity; behavior change
MDPI and ACS Style

Calder, A.J.; Hargreaves, E.A.; Hodge, K. Great Expectations: A Qualitative Analysis of the Factors That Influence Affective Forecasts for Exercise. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 551.

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