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Open AccessArticle

Bullying Victimization among Mexican Adolescents: Psychosocial Differences from an Ecological Approach

1
Department of Psychology, Coast University Center, University of Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta 48280, Mexico
2
Department of Education and Social Psychology, Pablo de Olavide University, 41013 Seville, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4831; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134831
Received: 3 June 2020 / Revised: 20 June 2020 / Accepted: 21 June 2020 / Published: 4 July 2020
This transversal study over a random representative sample of 1687 Mexican students attending public and private secondary schools (54% girls, 12–17 years old, M = 13.65. DT = 1.14) aimed to analyze psychosocial differences between victims and non-victims of bullying from the bioecological model. It included individual variables (ontosystem), familiar, community, and scholar factors (microsystem), and gender (macrosystem) to perform a multivariate discriminant analysis and a logistic regression analysis. The discriminant analysis found that psychological distress, offensive communication with mother and father, and a positive attitude toward social norms transgression characterized the high victimization cluster. For the non-victims, the discriminant variables were community implication, positive attitude toward institutional authority, and open communication with the mother. These variables allowed for correctly predicting membership in 76% of the cases. Logistic regression analysis found that psychological distress, offensive communication with the father, and being a boy increased the probability of high victimization, while a positive attitude toward authority, open communication with the mother, and being a girl decrease this probability. These results highlight the importance of open and offensive communication between adolescents and their parents on psychological distress, attitude toward authority, community implication, and bullying victimization. View Full-Text
Keywords: bullying victimization; parents–adolescent communication; psychological distress; attitude toward authority; community social support; gender bullying victimization; parents–adolescent communication; psychological distress; attitude toward authority; community social support; gender
MDPI and ACS Style

Nuñez-Fadda, S.M.; Castro-Castañeda, R.; Vargas-Jiménez, E.; Musitu-Ochoa, G.; Callejas-Jerónimo, J.E. Bullying Victimization among Mexican Adolescents: Psychosocial Differences from an Ecological Approach. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4831.

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