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Article

Conditions Leading to Elevated PM2.5 at Near-Road Monitoring Sites: Case Studies in Denver and Indianapolis

1
Sonoma Technology, Inc., Petaluma, CA 94954, USA
2
Washington State Department of Transportation, Olympia, WA 98504, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1634; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091634
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 30 April 2019 / Accepted: 6 May 2019 / Published: 10 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Near-Source Air Pollution)
We examined two near-road monitoring sites where the daily PM2.5 readings were among the highest of any near-road monitoring location in the U.S. during 2014–2016: Denver, Colorado, in February 2014 and Indianapolis, Indiana, in November 2016. At the Denver site, which had the highest measured U.S. near-road 24-hr PM2.5 concentrations in 2014, concentrations exceeded the daily National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) on three days during one week in 2014; the Indianapolis site had the second-highest number of daily exceedances of any near-road site in 2016 and the highest 3-year average PM2.5 of any near-road site during 2014–2016. Both sites had hourly pollutant, meteorological, and traffic data available, making them ideal for case studies. For both locations, we compared air pollution observations at the near-road site to observations at other sites in the urban area to calculate the near-road PM2.5 “increment” and evaluated the effects of changes in meteorology and traffic. The Denver near-road site consistently had the highest PM2.5 values in the Denver area, and was typically highest when winds were near-downwind, rather than directly downwind, to the freeway. Complex Denver site conditions (near-road buildings and roadway alignment) likely contributed to higher PM2.5 concentrations. The increment at Indianapolis was also highest under near-downwind, rather than directly downwind, conditions. At both sites, while the near-road site often had higher PM2.5 concentrations than nearby sites, there was no clear correlation between traffic conditions (vehicle speed, fleet mix) and the high PM2.5 concentrations. View Full-Text
Keywords: near-road; PM2.5; Denver; Indianapolis near-road; PM2.5; Denver; Indianapolis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brown, S.G.; Penfold, B.; Mukherjee, A.; Landsberg, K.; Eisinger, D.S. Conditions Leading to Elevated PM2.5 at Near-Road Monitoring Sites: Case Studies in Denver and Indianapolis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1634. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091634

AMA Style

Brown SG, Penfold B, Mukherjee A, Landsberg K, Eisinger DS. Conditions Leading to Elevated PM2.5 at Near-Road Monitoring Sites: Case Studies in Denver and Indianapolis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(9):1634. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091634

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brown, Steven G., Bryan Penfold, Anondo Mukherjee, Karin Landsberg, and Douglas S. Eisinger. 2019. "Conditions Leading to Elevated PM2.5 at Near-Road Monitoring Sites: Case Studies in Denver and Indianapolis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 9: 1634. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091634

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