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Article

Like Father, Like Son. Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and Media Consumption in Pre-School-Aged Children

1
Department of Psychology, Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt, 9020 Klagenfurt, Austria
2
Department of Children and Adolescent Medicine, Hospital Villach, 9500 Villach, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Author passed away.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 306; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030306
Received: 22 November 2018 / Revised: 18 January 2019 / Accepted: 19 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Obesity Treatment and Prevention)
An imbalance between energy input and energy needs contributes to the growing incidence of overweight children. Pre-schoolers normally like to move, but even at this young age, they are already affected by a lack of physical activity and a high amount of screen time. Media consumption contributes to unhealthy diets and extends the length of time spent sitting. Longer periods of sitting are, independent of the level of activity, seen as a risk factor for the development of obesity. In the present study, 160 pre-schoolers and their parents (128 mothers, 121 fathers) were examined. The results show deviations from actual recommendations regarding physical activity, time spent sitting, dietary intake, and media consumption. Increased screen time was associated with a higher weight status among pre-school-aged children. To provide a healthy upbringing, prevention and intervention measures should be implemented on a behavioral and relational level. View Full-Text
Keywords: preschool children; physical activity; dietary intake; recommendations by the WHO; media consumption preschool children; physical activity; dietary intake; recommendations by the WHO; media consumption
MDPI and ACS Style

Frate, N.; Jenull, B.; Birnbacher, R. Like Father, Like Son. Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and Media Consumption in Pre-School-Aged Children. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 306. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030306

AMA Style

Frate N, Jenull B, Birnbacher R. Like Father, Like Son. Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and Media Consumption in Pre-School-Aged Children. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(3):306. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030306

Chicago/Turabian Style

Frate, Nadja, Brigitte Jenull, and Robert Birnbacher. 2019. "Like Father, Like Son. Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and Media Consumption in Pre-School-Aged Children" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 3: 306. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030306

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