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Open AccessArticle

Equity, Health, and Sustainability with PROVE: The Evaluation of a Portuguese Program for a Short Distance Supply Chain of Fruits and Vegetables

1
Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), CIS-IUL, 1649-026 Lisboa, Portugal
2
Institute of Health Equity, UCL, London WC1E 7HB, UK
3
Department of Economics, Universidad de Alcalá, 28801 Alcalá, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 5083; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16245083
Received: 15 October 2019 / Revised: 30 November 2019 / Accepted: 7 December 2019 / Published: 12 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A More Sustainable and Healthier Future for All: What Works?)
PROVE is a Portuguese program that empowers small-scale farmers organized into local networks to directly commercialize baskets of locally produced fruits and vegetables to consumers. This study applied a post-test-only non-equivalent group design to evaluate the resulting influence on the social empowerment of farmers and on consumer diets. The method included conducting a survey of PROVE farmers (n = 36) and a survey of PROVE consumers (n = 294) that were compared against matched samples of Portuguese respondents of international surveys (European Social Survey, n = 36 and the INHERIT Five-Country Survey, n = 571, respectively). PROVE farmers reported higher scores for perceived influence on the work environment than the national sample. PROVE consumers were more likely to eat five or more portions of fruits and vegetables a day in comparison to the matched sample of Portuguese citizens (average odds ratio: 3.05, p < 0.05). Being a PROVE consumer also generated an impact on the likelihood of consuming no more than two portions of red meat a week (average odds ratio: 1.56, p < 0.05). The evaluation study suggests that the promotion of short supply chains of fruits and vegetables can make a positive contribution to a healthier, more sustainable, and fairer future in food consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: short distance supply chain; fruits and vegetables; farmers; consumers; empowerment; health; equity; sustainability short distance supply chain; fruits and vegetables; farmers; consumers; empowerment; health; equity; sustainability
MDPI and ACS Style

Craveiro, D.; Marques, S.; Marreiros, A.; Bell, R.; Khan, M.; Godinho, C.; Quiroga, S.; Suárez, C. Equity, Health, and Sustainability with PROVE: The Evaluation of a Portuguese Program for a Short Distance Supply Chain of Fruits and Vegetables. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 5083.

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