Next Article in Journal
Validity and Reliability of a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) to Assess Dietary Intake of Preschool Children
Next Article in Special Issue
Controversies in the Science of Sedentary Behaviour and Health: Insights, Perspectives and Future Directions from the 2018 Queensland Sedentary Behaviour Think Tank
Previous Article in Journal
Utilization of a Diet Optimization Model in Ensuring Adequate Intake among Pregnant Women in Selangor, Malaysia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Does Sleep Mediate the Association between School Pressure, Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Psychological Symptoms in Early Adolescents? A 12-Country Study
Open AccessArticle

Relationships between Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Cognitive Functions in Office Workers

1
The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, 11486 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Center for Functional and Diagnostic Imaging and Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, 2650 Hvidovre, Denmark
3
Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark
4
Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå, Sweden
5
Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4721; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234721
Received: 11 September 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 23 November 2019 / Published: 27 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
Increasing evidence from animal experiments suggests that physical activity (PA) promotes neuroplasticity and learning. For humans, most research on the relationship between PA, sedentary behaviour (SB), and cognitive function has relied on self-reported measures of behaviour. Office work is characterised by high durations of SB combined with high work demands. While previous studies have shown that fitter office workers outperform their less fit colleagues in cognitive tests, the importance of PA and SB remains unknown. This study investigated associations between objectively measured PA and SB, using hip-worn accelerometers, and cognitive functions in 334 office workers. Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) was not associated with any cognitive outcome. However, time spent in SB tended to be positively associated with words recalled in free recall (β = 0.125). For the least fit participants, the average length of MVPA bouts was favourably related to Stroop performance (β = −0.211), while for the fitter individuals, a longer average length of MVPA bouts was related to worse recognition (β = −0.216). While our findings indicate that the length of MVPA bouts was associated with better Stroop performance in the least fit participants, our findings do not support the notion that more time spent in MVPA or less time in SB is associated with better cognitive function. View Full-Text
Keywords: executive functions; episodic memory; cognition; physical activity; sedentary behaviour; office workers executive functions; episodic memory; cognition; physical activity; sedentary behaviour; office workers
MDPI and ACS Style

Bojsen-Møller, E.; Boraxbekk, C.-J.; Ekblom, Ö.; Blom, V.; Ekblom, M.M. Relationships between Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Cognitive Functions in Office Workers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4721.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop